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Colonizing Hawai'i: The Cultural Power of Law (review)

Colonizing Hawai'i: The Cultural Power of Law (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2001 she handled the Foucaldian themes of discipline and gender in ways that I could never quite make clear in my dissertation. I was even dismayed that her work seemed so much more thorough in several places than mine. While I disagree with her approach in some important ways, I also recognize what a worthy piece of scholarship it is. Sally Merry brings the perspective of the cultural anthropologist to this social history of law in Hawai`i. Her concerns are strongly related to recent theoretical trends that stem from the writings and theories of Michel Foucault and Antonio Gramsci, using their ideas on hegemonic discourse as the lens through which she examines western law as a colonial tool. The Hawaiian Kingdom is the arena where European and American (haole) ideas and practices confronted the Native Hawaiian, and Merry is clear that the result of the confrontation was an ambiguous blend of responses in which Hawaiians altered their identities, conforming to the ideas of civilization while resisting colonization itself. Along the way the author presents intriguing analyses of the legal system as a "site of power" wherein a different kind of discipline emerged from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Colonizing Hawai'i: The Cultural Power of Law (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 13 (2) – Jul 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2001 she handled the Foucaldian themes of discipline and gender in ways that I could never quite make clear in my dissertation. I was even dismayed that her work seemed so much more thorough in several places than mine. While I disagree with her approach in some important ways, I also recognize what a worthy piece of scholarship it is. Sally Merry brings the perspective of the cultural anthropologist to this social history of law in Hawai`i. Her concerns are strongly related to recent theoretical trends that stem from the writings and theories of Michel Foucault and Antonio Gramsci, using their ideas on hegemonic discourse as the lens through which she examines western law as a colonial tool. The Hawaiian Kingdom is the arena where European and American (haole) ideas and practices confronted the Native Hawaiian, and Merry is clear that the result of the confrontation was an ambiguous blend of responses in which Hawaiians altered their identities, conforming to the ideas of civilization while resisting colonization itself. Along the way the author presents intriguing analyses of the legal system as a "site of power" wherein a different kind of discipline emerged from

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 1, 2001

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