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Colloquial Malay Discourse Particle punya as a Modal Evidential

Colloquial Malay Discourse Particle punya as a Modal Evidential <p>Abstract:</p><p>In this paper, I present an analysis of the discourse particle <i>punya</i> in Colloquial Malay as a modal evidential. I claim that the use of <i>punya</i> indicates that the attitude holder is certain about the truth of the propositional content of the utterance and that the source of the information presented is of the inferential type. I show that the attitude holder may be the speaker or the external argument of verbs of saying and believing. The proposed analysis connects <i>punya</i> with epistemic modal auxiliaries such as English <i>must</i> and Colloquial Malay preverbal modal <i>mesti</i>, both of which mark the attitude holder&apos;s certainty as well as the inferential nature of the evidence for the asserted proposition. However, unlike epistemic <i>must/mesti</i>, which may appear in questions under certain aspectual conditions, <i>punya</i> cannot appear in questions. I claim that <i>punya</i> differs from <i>must/mesti</i> in who can be considered the attitude holder of the evidence/knowledge. In particular, while the attitude holder of a <i>must/mesti</i> statement can be a contextually relevant group that is indeterminate, this is not possible for a <i>punya</i> statement. I argue that this difference is the source of the contrasting behaviors of <i>punya</i> versus <i>must/mesti</i> in questions. The current analysis adds to the empirical base on the crosslinguistic patterning of the connection between modality and evidentiality and has implications on the notion of "evidential perspective shift."</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Colloquial Malay Discourse Particle punya as a Modal Evidential

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 58 (2) – Mar 11, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>In this paper, I present an analysis of the discourse particle <i>punya</i> in Colloquial Malay as a modal evidential. I claim that the use of <i>punya</i> indicates that the attitude holder is certain about the truth of the propositional content of the utterance and that the source of the information presented is of the inferential type. I show that the attitude holder may be the speaker or the external argument of verbs of saying and believing. The proposed analysis connects <i>punya</i> with epistemic modal auxiliaries such as English <i>must</i> and Colloquial Malay preverbal modal <i>mesti</i>, both of which mark the attitude holder&apos;s certainty as well as the inferential nature of the evidence for the asserted proposition. However, unlike epistemic <i>must/mesti</i>, which may appear in questions under certain aspectual conditions, <i>punya</i> cannot appear in questions. I claim that <i>punya</i> differs from <i>must/mesti</i> in who can be considered the attitude holder of the evidence/knowledge. In particular, while the attitude holder of a <i>must/mesti</i> statement can be a contextually relevant group that is indeterminate, this is not possible for a <i>punya</i> statement. I argue that this difference is the source of the contrasting behaviors of <i>punya</i> versus <i>must/mesti</i> in questions. The current analysis adds to the empirical base on the crosslinguistic patterning of the connection between modality and evidentiality and has implications on the notion of "evidential perspective shift."</p>

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 11, 2020

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