Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Cognitive Error and Contemplative Practices: The Cultivation of Discernment in Mind and Heart

Cognitive Error and Contemplative Practices: The Cultivation of Discernment in Mind and Heart The Cultivation of Discernment in Mind and Heart Wesley J. Wildman Boston University Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion Brains are amazing organs in all creatures with central nervous systems and especially in human beings. But they are not perfect. Without forgetting the larger success story of cognitive evolution, I want to explore the way that cognitive biases sometimes produce errors in both religious and secular social settings and how such errors can be diagnosed and corrected when they occur. This will involve noticing that error diagnosis and correction is a process that certain social groups have a vested interest in resisting or neglecting, in some respects, while the very same social groups may furnish resources that support the detection of cognitive errors, in other respects. This presents a moral quandary for both secular and religious groups. Should we educate children to be fully aware of their cognitive vulnerability to advertising, thereby learning how to resist and eventually become immune to one of the fundamental power sources of modern market economies? Should religious groups explain to young people their cognitive tendencies to posit the action of supernatural beings whether or not any such action exists, even though http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Cognitive Error and Contemplative Practices: The Cultivation of Discernment in Mind and Heart

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 29 (1) – Oct 17, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/cognitive-error-and-contemplative-practices-the-cultivation-of-DwnZm0aip7
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Cultivation of Discernment in Mind and Heart Wesley J. Wildman Boston University Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion Brains are amazing organs in all creatures with central nervous systems and especially in human beings. But they are not perfect. Without forgetting the larger success story of cognitive evolution, I want to explore the way that cognitive biases sometimes produce errors in both religious and secular social settings and how such errors can be diagnosed and corrected when they occur. This will involve noticing that error diagnosis and correction is a process that certain social groups have a vested interest in resisting or neglecting, in some respects, while the very same social groups may furnish resources that support the detection of cognitive errors, in other respects. This presents a moral quandary for both secular and religious groups. Should we educate children to be fully aware of their cognitive vulnerability to advertising, thereby learning how to resist and eventually become immune to one of the fundamental power sources of modern market economies? Should religious groups explain to young people their cognitive tendencies to posit the action of supernatural beings whether or not any such action exists, even though

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 17, 2009

There are no references for this article.