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Civility, Subordination, and Praxis

Civility, Subordination, and Praxis 26 – Consider, for example, the student attending his grandparents’ church with the offensive sermon. It is not hard to extrapolate what the subject of that sermon might well have been—imagine how different the student’s sense that he couldn’t just walk out, that he had to sit and argue the case civilly, would have made him feel had he himself been gay and struggling with the decision to keep himself closeted from his family. It is one thing to insist I be polite to people who disagree with me; it is another to ask politeness for people who reject and dehuman- ize me. Amy Olberding Department of Philosophy, University of Oklahoma aolberding@ou.edu I am grateful to the reviewers who have so carefully and insightfully engaged with my work. Promoting civility at our present political moment is often nauseating. Even as I write this (in February 2020), I am acutely aware that by the time it reaches print, the world may well be worse in ways that would alter whatever arguments or reflections I can offer here. The struggle is one caught most directly in Olufemi Taiwo’s response: the world we inhabit is not just riven by social and political http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Civility, Subordination, and Praxis

Philosophy East and West , Volume 70 (4) – Oct 28, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

26 – Consider, for example, the student attending his grandparents’ church with the offensive sermon. It is not hard to extrapolate what the subject of that sermon might well have been—imagine how different the student’s sense that he couldn’t just walk out, that he had to sit and argue the case civilly, would have made him feel had he himself been gay and struggling with the decision to keep himself closeted from his family. It is one thing to insist I be polite to people who disagree with me; it is another to ask politeness for people who reject and dehuman- ize me. Amy Olberding Department of Philosophy, University of Oklahoma aolberding@ou.edu I am grateful to the reviewers who have so carefully and insightfully engaged with my work. Promoting civility at our present political moment is often nauseating. Even as I write this (in February 2020), I am acutely aware that by the time it reaches print, the world may well be worse in ways that would alter whatever arguments or reflections I can offer here. The struggle is one caught most directly in Olufemi Taiwo’s response: the world we inhabit is not just riven by social and political

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 28, 2020

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