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City of the Dead and Song of the Night by Gao Xingjian (review)

City of the Dead and Song of the Night by Gao Xingjian (review) sional background, play synopses, themes, characterizations, audience/society reception in the context of social changes, Chen's own understanding of the plays, and readings/interpretations from English- and Chinese-language scholarship. More importantly, Chen presents the playwrights and their plays in relation to each other, thus delineating the larger picture of China's pursuit of national and gender identities during the twentieth century. Also helpful is the concise reference to 2010 edition plays omitted in the 2014 abridged edition--in particular their relationship to the plays included in the latter, for the reader's further interest and research. A bit more analysis of the use of language and its changes along the timeline might have added yet another layer to this introduction. Finally, the reader should note that, as Chen points out, the compilation of this anthology took place after her twenty years of teaching and that the texts included here are what she has found to be "well received by students of diverse cultural and language backgrounds" (p. 1). The pedagogical consideration makes this anthology particularly useful for educators and practitioners. In the excellent introduction described above, Chen includes her thoughtful reflections on classroom experience and student reception, with inspiring pedagogical case studies. For http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

City of the Dead and Song of the Night by Gao Xingjian (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 33 (1) – Mar 11, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

sional background, play synopses, themes, characterizations, audience/society reception in the context of social changes, Chen's own understanding of the plays, and readings/interpretations from English- and Chinese-language scholarship. More importantly, Chen presents the playwrights and their plays in relation to each other, thus delineating the larger picture of China's pursuit of national and gender identities during the twentieth century. Also helpful is the concise reference to 2010 edition plays omitted in the 2014 abridged edition--in particular their relationship to the plays included in the latter, for the reader's further interest and research. A bit more analysis of the use of language and its changes along the timeline might have added yet another layer to this introduction. Finally, the reader should note that, as Chen points out, the compilation of this anthology took place after her twenty years of teaching and that the texts included here are what she has found to be "well received by students of diverse cultural and language backgrounds" (p. 1). The pedagogical consideration makes this anthology particularly useful for educators and practitioners. In the excellent introduction described above, Chen includes her thoughtful reflections on classroom experience and student reception, with inspiring pedagogical case studies. For

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 11, 2016

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