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Cit: Consciousness (review)

Cit: Consciousness (review) that the most undeniable truths of life are experiential, Grimes even devotes some of his commentarial passages to anecdotes of his own encounters with gurus (pp. 86­ 87) and meditation experiences (pp. 121­122). While the running commentary might then disappoint those readers who have become accustomed to a more exclu´ sively philosophical exegesis of Sankara, Grimes in taking this tack is only fulfilling his stated purpose of displaying how the Vivekacudamani has spoken and can con¯ ¯ tinue to speak to those who study it for spiritual sustenance; in any event it reflects the genre of the text. The translation itself is a testament to Grimes' surpassing Sanskrit skills and thorough knowledge of Vedantic textual exegesis. The unusually lucid presentation of ¯ ´ the Sanskrit slokas is rendered with exactness and eloquent clarity in the English. The accompanying Upanisadic cross-referencing and Sanskrit-English lexicon of key terms will prove themselves enormously helpful to lay readers, students, and scholars. In his efforts to make this classic speak to spiritual seekers, modern readers, and scholars alike, and thus to reveal its perennial richness and multivalence, Grimes has resoundingly succeeded. Cit: Consciousness. By Bina Gupta. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Cit: Consciousness (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (4) – Oct 24, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

that the most undeniable truths of life are experiential, Grimes even devotes some of his commentarial passages to anecdotes of his own encounters with gurus (pp. 86­ 87) and meditation experiences (pp. 121­122). While the running commentary might then disappoint those readers who have become accustomed to a more exclu´ sively philosophical exegesis of Sankara, Grimes in taking this tack is only fulfilling his stated purpose of displaying how the Vivekacudamani has spoken and can con¯ ¯ tinue to speak to those who study it for spiritual sustenance; in any event it reflects the genre of the text. The translation itself is a testament to Grimes' surpassing Sanskrit skills and thorough knowledge of Vedantic textual exegesis. The unusually lucid presentation of ¯ ´ the Sanskrit slokas is rendered with exactness and eloquent clarity in the English. The accompanying Upanisadic cross-referencing and Sanskrit-English lexicon of key terms will prove themselves enormously helpful to lay readers, students, and scholars. In his efforts to make this classic speak to spiritual seekers, modern readers, and scholars alike, and thus to reveal its perennial richness and multivalence, Grimes has resoundingly succeeded. Cit: Consciousness. By Bina Gupta. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp.

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 24, 2005

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