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Christianity and the Religions: From Confrontation to Dialogue (review)

Christianity and the Religions: From Confrontation to Dialogue (review) BOOK REVIEWS had implications for technological invention. The predominant epistemology among working scientists--particularly in physics and biology--is what Ian Barbour called "critical realism," meaning that scientific theories and laws refer to real physical realities but nevertheless are in need of constant revision in light of developing experimental evidence. One may well wonder, therefore, whether Buddhist dialogue with the natural sciences would be advanced in more coherent directions if it assumed a "critical realist" epistemology from the start, in place of the two-truth epistemology Nagarjuna. Since not all Buddhist traditions assume Nagarjuna's epistemology, contemporary Buddhist-science dialogue need not be locked into this model. My point in raising this issue is not to belittle the Buddhist-science dialogue in The New Physics and Cosmology. Indeed, this book a wonderful read for anyone interested in interreligious dialogue with the natural sciences. My point rather is to raise the possibility of pushing contemporary Buddhist dialogue with the natural sciences to consider other options in its encounter with the natural sciences that might lead to the creative transformation of both the sciences and Buddhist thought and practice. Of course as a Christian, I have no business pushing my Buddhist brothers and sisters into any http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Christianity and the Religions: From Confrontation to Dialogue (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Oct 10, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS had implications for technological invention. The predominant epistemology among working scientists--particularly in physics and biology--is what Ian Barbour called "critical realism," meaning that scientific theories and laws refer to real physical realities but nevertheless are in need of constant revision in light of developing experimental evidence. One may well wonder, therefore, whether Buddhist dialogue with the natural sciences would be advanced in more coherent directions if it assumed a "critical realist" epistemology from the start, in place of the two-truth epistemology Nagarjuna. Since not all Buddhist traditions assume Nagarjuna's epistemology, contemporary Buddhist-science dialogue need not be locked into this model. My point in raising this issue is not to belittle the Buddhist-science dialogue in The New Physics and Cosmology. Indeed, this book a wonderful read for anyone interested in interreligious dialogue with the natural sciences. My point rather is to raise the possibility of pushing contemporary Buddhist dialogue with the natural sciences to consider other options in its encounter with the natural sciences that might lead to the creative transformation of both the sciences and Buddhist thought and practice. Of course as a Christian, I have no business pushing my Buddhist brothers and sisters into any

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2005

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