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Christian Politics in Oceania edited by Matt Tomlinson and Debra McDougall (review)

Christian Politics in Oceania edited by Matt Tomlinson and Debra McDougall (review) the contemporary pacific · 26:2 (2014) Abelam culture (24). Others may feel that this issue is rather more complex. These reservations aside, the academic world is fortunate that Gerrits undertook what has clearly been a long-term labor of love. Though The Haus Tambaran of Bongiora is unlikely to draw a wide academic audience, this should not be held against it because it succeeds well in achieving its modest and clearly identified goals. to imagine that circumstances did not commonly force similar adaptations in precontact times. Lacking anthropological skills, as the author notes, he was unable to situate his accounts of the yam and tambaran cults in the social and cultural organization of Abelam society. As he also acknowledges, he obtained virtually no information from female interlocutors and hardly any more on women's participation in the structures and events he describes. It is part of the charm of Gerrits's work, however, that he goes out of his way to emphasize these limitations and even to acknowledge where he thinks his claims may be wrong, for instance regarding his introductory survey of Abelam social organization (370n13). Finally, the reader is advised that, although Gerrits's descriptions of core aspects of Abelam http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Christian Politics in Oceania edited by Matt Tomlinson and Debra McDougall (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 26 (2) – Sep 17, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 26:2 (2014) Abelam culture (24). Others may feel that this issue is rather more complex. These reservations aside, the academic world is fortunate that Gerrits undertook what has clearly been a long-term labor of love. Though The Haus Tambaran of Bongiora is unlikely to draw a wide academic audience, this should not be held against it because it succeeds well in achieving its modest and clearly identified goals. to imagine that circumstances did not commonly force similar adaptations in precontact times. Lacking anthropological skills, as the author notes, he was unable to situate his accounts of the yam and tambaran cults in the social and cultural organization of Abelam society. As he also acknowledges, he obtained virtually no information from female interlocutors and hardly any more on women's participation in the structures and events he describes. It is part of the charm of Gerrits's work, however, that he goes out of his way to emphasize these limitations and even to acknowledge where he thinks his claims may be wrong, for instance regarding his introductory survey of Abelam social organization (370n13). Finally, the reader is advised that, although Gerrits's descriptions of core aspects of Abelam

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 17, 2014

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