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Christian-Buddhist Dialogue on Loving the Enemy

Christian-Buddhist Dialogue on Loving the Enemy ARTICLES Wioleta Polinska North Central College We are taught to think that we need a foreign enemy. Governments work hard to get us to be afraid and to hate so we will rally behind them. If we do not have an enemy, they will invent one in order to mobilize us. Yet they are also victims.1 --Thich Nhat Hanh We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for the victims of our nation, and for those it calls enemy, for no document from human hands can make these humans any less our brothers.2 --Martin Luther King Jr. Literally speaking, Ahimsa means ``non-killing.'' . . . To one who follows this doctrine there is no room for an enemy.3 --M. K. Gandhi In his autobiography, Martin Luther King Jr. comments that he initially considered Jesus's commands such as ``turn the other cheek'' or ``love your enemies'' as limited to individual relationships. Only after reading Gandhi in the late 1940s did he conclude that the love ethic had a much broader scope. Love became to him an effective principle applied to racial groups and nations in conflict and was ``a potent instrument for social and collective transformation.''4 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Christian-Buddhist Dialogue on Loving the Enemy

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Aug 30, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

ARTICLES Wioleta Polinska North Central College We are taught to think that we need a foreign enemy. Governments work hard to get us to be afraid and to hate so we will rally behind them. If we do not have an enemy, they will invent one in order to mobilize us. Yet they are also victims.1 --Thich Nhat Hanh We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for the victims of our nation, and for those it calls enemy, for no document from human hands can make these humans any less our brothers.2 --Martin Luther King Jr. Literally speaking, Ahimsa means ``non-killing.'' . . . To one who follows this doctrine there is no room for an enemy.3 --M. K. Gandhi In his autobiography, Martin Luther King Jr. comments that he initially considered Jesus's commands such as ``turn the other cheek'' or ``love your enemies'' as limited to individual relationships. Only after reading Gandhi in the late 1940s did he conclude that the love ethic had a much broader scope. Love became to him an effective principle applied to racial groups and nations in conflict and was ``a potent instrument for social and collective transformation.''4

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 30, 2007

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