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Chinese Martial Arts Training Manuals: A Historical Survey (review)

Chinese Martial Arts Training Manuals: A Historical Survey (review) Reviews Brian Kennedy and Elizabeth Guo. Chinese Martial Arts Training Manuals: A Historical Survey. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2005. 328 pp. Paperback $19.95, ISBN 1-55643-557-6. This is the first book to approach the Chinese martial arts from the perspective of so-called training manuals that have either been formally published or handwritten over the ages. It contains a wealth of information, especially concerning materials published during the Republican era in China (1911­1949). While the content is clearly labeled in the various sections and chapters, the organization of the book can still be a bit frustrating as there are many important facts scattered throughout the book. One example is Kang Ge Wu's "Top Twelve Chinese Martial Arts Classics" (part 1, chapter 9), which needs to be considered with part 2, "The Books." Actually, a couple of the twelve "Martial Arts Classics" listed have little or nothing to do with the martial arts as such. For instance, Seven Books of Martial Classics were used in preparation for the written portions of military examinations, but contain no significant martial arts material. On the other hand, while the Important Content of the Military Classics (Wujing Zongyao ), published around 1044, contains no http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Chinese Martial Arts Training Manuals: A Historical Survey (review)

China Review International , Volume 15 (2) – Aug 5, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews Brian Kennedy and Elizabeth Guo. Chinese Martial Arts Training Manuals: A Historical Survey. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books, 2005. 328 pp. Paperback $19.95, ISBN 1-55643-557-6. This is the first book to approach the Chinese martial arts from the perspective of so-called training manuals that have either been formally published or handwritten over the ages. It contains a wealth of information, especially concerning materials published during the Republican era in China (1911­1949). While the content is clearly labeled in the various sections and chapters, the organization of the book can still be a bit frustrating as there are many important facts scattered throughout the book. One example is Kang Ge Wu's "Top Twelve Chinese Martial Arts Classics" (part 1, chapter 9), which needs to be considered with part 2, "The Books." Actually, a couple of the twelve "Martial Arts Classics" listed have little or nothing to do with the martial arts as such. For instance, Seven Books of Martial Classics were used in preparation for the written portions of military examinations, but contain no significant martial arts material. On the other hand, while the Important Content of the Military Classics (Wujing Zongyao ), published around 1044, contains no

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 5, 2009

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