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China's Telecommunications Revolution (review)

China's Telecommunications Revolution (review) 114 China Review International: Vol. 1, No. 1, Note 1. According to Smith (2000), some farmers insist that their earnings are barely enough to pay their costs and taxes, and when the harvest fails, costs exceed earnings because of the high tax. Therefore, they cannot afford to live in their villages and have no other choice but to move to industrial cities. "For example, in Yuandu, about 1,000 officials live off the fees collected from the town's 4,000 farmers." Eric Harwit. China's Telecommunications Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. xvii, 249 pp. Hardcover $100.00, isbn 978-0-19923374-8. Restaurants and shops are clustered together on a high street because, although they may be competitors, together they form a focal point in the community--a spot associated with good times and happy memories in the minds of customers and, therefore, a place to return to often. So, too, is the study of telecommunications in China. Imagine my surprise one day, walking down through the book exhibit of a research conference, to come upon Eric Harwit's concise book China's Telecommunications Revolution when I had just struggled to publish my own From Iron Fist to Invisible Hand: The Uneven Path of Telecom Policy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China's Telecommunications Revolution (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (1) – Sep 15, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

114 China Review International: Vol. 1, No. 1, Note 1. According to Smith (2000), some farmers insist that their earnings are barely enough to pay their costs and taxes, and when the harvest fails, costs exceed earnings because of the high tax. Therefore, they cannot afford to live in their villages and have no other choice but to move to industrial cities. "For example, in Yuandu, about 1,000 officials live off the fees collected from the town's 4,000 farmers." Eric Harwit. China's Telecommunications Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. xvii, 249 pp. Hardcover $100.00, isbn 978-0-19923374-8. Restaurants and shops are clustered together on a high street because, although they may be competitors, together they form a focal point in the community--a spot associated with good times and happy memories in the minds of customers and, therefore, a place to return to often. So, too, is the study of telecommunications in China. Imagine my surprise one day, walking down through the book exhibit of a research conference, to come upon Eric Harwit's concise book China's Telecommunications Revolution when I had just struggled to publish my own From Iron Fist to Invisible Hand: The Uneven Path of Telecom Policy

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 15, 2009

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