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China’s Fourth World Borderlands

China’s Fourth World Borderlands Features Sulmaan Wasift Khan. Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China's Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015. xxiv, 189 pp. Hardcover $34.95, isbn 978-1-46962110-4. Bertil Lintner. Great Game East: India, China, and the Struggle for Asia's Most Volatile Frontier. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015. vi, 343 pp. Hardcover $35.00, isbn 978-0-30-019567-5. In a state-centric approach to international relations, a nation-state is, at its core, a capital with an army and, usually, a language. The mainstream approach to China­ India foreign policy therefore can be reduced to Beijing­New Delhi relations. From this perspective, Beijing­Delhi relations are about how state centers manage flows across borders, goods and people, trade and migration. In contrast, Lintner and Khan, in line with the postmodern negation of "centrism," ask readers to de-center the nation and to focus not on the capital but on the peoples of the frontiers and the borderlands. These cross-border communities are threatened by self-aggrandizing and narcissistic centers demanding purity and loyalty. When Beijing insists that people cannot be both Tibetan and Nepalese or Chinese and Sikkimese (Khan, p. 67), it turns cross-border people into traitors. The communities are made http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China’s Fourth World Borderlands

China Review International , Volume 21 (2) – Nov 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Features Sulmaan Wasift Khan. Muslim, Trader, Nomad, Spy: China's Cold War and the People of the Tibetan Borderlands. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2015. xxiv, 189 pp. Hardcover $34.95, isbn 978-1-46962110-4. Bertil Lintner. Great Game East: India, China, and the Struggle for Asia's Most Volatile Frontier. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015. vi, 343 pp. Hardcover $35.00, isbn 978-0-30-019567-5. In a state-centric approach to international relations, a nation-state is, at its core, a capital with an army and, usually, a language. The mainstream approach to China­ India foreign policy therefore can be reduced to Beijing­New Delhi relations. From this perspective, Beijing­Delhi relations are about how state centers manage flows across borders, goods and people, trade and migration. In contrast, Lintner and Khan, in line with the postmodern negation of "centrism," ask readers to de-center the nation and to focus not on the capital but on the peoples of the frontiers and the borderlands. These cross-border communities are threatened by self-aggrandizing and narcissistic centers demanding purity and loyalty. When Beijing insists that people cannot be both Tibetan and Nepalese or Chinese and Sikkimese (Khan, p. 67), it turns cross-border people into traitors. The communities are made

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 28, 2014

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