Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

China's Energy Strategy: Economic Structure, Technological Choices, and Energy Consumption (review)

China's Energy Strategy: Economic Structure, Technological Choices, and Energy Consumption (review) i88 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 Xiannuan Lin. China's Energy Strategy: Economic Structure, Technological Choices, and Energy Consumption. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger Publishers, 1996. xvii, 203 pp. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 0-275-95306-8. This book offers important insights into a fascinating feature of China's economic growth during the reform era--the declining energy intensity of the Chinese economy. The book crisply proceeds through summarizing the issue, propounding an input-output model of energy consumption, explaining the results produced by the model, and pursuing the model's insights in a case study of the iron and steel industry. As they grow, developing economies usually exhibit increasing energy intensity (the ratio of commercial energy consumption to GDP), a trend followed by China for thirty years after the founding of the People's Republic. The uniformity of this trend across China and other developing countries led outside observers reasonably to expect that growing energy and electric power shortages in China in the late 1970s would constrain economic growth. For example, the CIA (1980) predicted that electric power shortages would restrict China's economic growth to 3 percent per year in the first half of the 1980s.1 The Chinese economy dramatically disproved these predictions. From 1981 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China's Energy Strategy: Economic Structure, Technological Choices, and Energy Consumption (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/china-s-energy-strategy-economic-structure-technological-choices-and-FYXTFo1zz1
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

i88 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 Xiannuan Lin. China's Energy Strategy: Economic Structure, Technological Choices, and Energy Consumption. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger Publishers, 1996. xvii, 203 pp. Hardcover $65.00, isbn 0-275-95306-8. This book offers important insights into a fascinating feature of China's economic growth during the reform era--the declining energy intensity of the Chinese economy. The book crisply proceeds through summarizing the issue, propounding an input-output model of energy consumption, explaining the results produced by the model, and pursuing the model's insights in a case study of the iron and steel industry. As they grow, developing economies usually exhibit increasing energy intensity (the ratio of commercial energy consumption to GDP), a trend followed by China for thirty years after the founding of the People's Republic. The uniformity of this trend across China and other developing countries led outside observers reasonably to expect that growing energy and electric power shortages in China in the late 1970s would constrain economic growth. For example, the CIA (1980) predicted that electric power shortages would restrict China's economic growth to 3 percent per year in the first half of the 1980s.1 The Chinese economy dramatically disproved these predictions. From 1981

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

There are no references for this article.