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China in the World: A History since 1644 by The Curriculum Specialists at Primary Source, Inc., editors (review)

China in the World: A History since 1644 by The Curriculum Specialists at Primary Source, Inc.,... China Review International: Vol. 18, No. 4, 2011 2. The stereotypical nature of this type of earlier performance illustration and its possible origin in Buddhist sutra illustration is discussed in this author's Chinese Popular Culture and Ming Chantefables (Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 1998), pp. 53­67. 3. Hsiao argues that there may well have been such backdrops but does not provide any evidence for their prevalence during the Ming wanli period. According to James I. Crump, theatrical props did not offer elaborate backgrounds but comprised screens, drapes, and items of furniture (Chinese Theater in the Days of Kubilai Khan [Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 1981], pp. 57, 63­66). 4. Hegel notes such conventional scenes as "supplication and submission" in both fictional and dramatic texts (Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 225). An important study not cited by Hsiao that analyzes the conventionality of narrative illustration in the Ming period is Anne Farrer's "The Shui-hu Chuan: A Study in the Development of Late Ming Woodblock Illustrations" (PhD diss., University of London, SOAS, 1984). 5. Hegel, Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 229. 6. Ibid., p. 197. 7. See illustration provided in Hegel, Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 199. 8. Hsiao does refer to this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China in the World: A History since 1644 by The Curriculum Specialists at Primary Source, Inc., editors (review)

China Review International , Volume 18 (4) – Jan 30, 2011

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Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 18, No. 4, 2011 2. The stereotypical nature of this type of earlier performance illustration and its possible origin in Buddhist sutra illustration is discussed in this author's Chinese Popular Culture and Ming Chantefables (Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 1998), pp. 53­67. 3. Hsiao argues that there may well have been such backdrops but does not provide any evidence for their prevalence during the Ming wanli period. According to James I. Crump, theatrical props did not offer elaborate backgrounds but comprised screens, drapes, and items of furniture (Chinese Theater in the Days of Kubilai Khan [Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 1981], pp. 57, 63­66). 4. Hegel notes such conventional scenes as "supplication and submission" in both fictional and dramatic texts (Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 225). An important study not cited by Hsiao that analyzes the conventionality of narrative illustration in the Ming period is Anne Farrer's "The Shui-hu Chuan: A Study in the Development of Late Ming Woodblock Illustrations" (PhD diss., University of London, SOAS, 1984). 5. Hegel, Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 229. 6. Ibid., p. 197. 7. See illustration provided in Hegel, Reading Illustrated Fiction, p. 199. 8. Hsiao does refer to this

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China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 30, 2011

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