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China as a Great Power: Myths, Realities and Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region (review)

China as a Great Power: Myths, Realities and Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region (review) Reviews 139 the chapter on the Yongzheng edicts themselves might more usefully have been placed at the beginning, rather than as the penultimate section. In combining institutional and social history, and in placing the development and, in at least some cases, the transformation of these social outcast groups as socially integrated members of the commoner population, Hansson has given us a valuable addition to the literature on late imperial Chinese culture and society. Kenneth J. Hammond New Mexico State University Kenneth J. Hammond is an assistantprofessor ofhistory, specializing in the cultural and intellectual history oflater imperial China. Stuart Harris and Gary Klintworth, editors. China as a Great Power: Myths, Realities and Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. 382 pp. Hardcover $39.95, isbn 0-312-12106-7. In the last few years, the rise of China has again caught the attention and tested the imagination of tiiose who have an academic or professional concern with contemporary China. The result is a flourishing literature on the studies of China's growing power. The central questions that these studies have asked are simple and straightforward: is China becoming a great power? And in what sense is China a great power? http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China as a Great Power: Myths, Realities and Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 139 the chapter on the Yongzheng edicts themselves might more usefully have been placed at the beginning, rather than as the penultimate section. In combining institutional and social history, and in placing the development and, in at least some cases, the transformation of these social outcast groups as socially integrated members of the commoner population, Hansson has given us a valuable addition to the literature on late imperial Chinese culture and society. Kenneth J. Hammond New Mexico State University Kenneth J. Hammond is an assistantprofessor ofhistory, specializing in the cultural and intellectual history oflater imperial China. Stuart Harris and Gary Klintworth, editors. China as a Great Power: Myths, Realities and Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. 382 pp. Hardcover $39.95, isbn 0-312-12106-7. In the last few years, the rise of China has again caught the attention and tested the imagination of tiiose who have an academic or professional concern with contemporary China. The result is a flourishing literature on the studies of China's growing power. The central questions that these studies have asked are simple and straightforward: is China becoming a great power? And in what sense is China a great power?

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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