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China and Korea: Dynamic Relations (review)

China and Korea: Dynamic Relations (review) 172 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. ?, Spring 1998 Chae-Jin Lee, in collaboration with Doo-Bok Park. China and Korea: Dynamic Relations. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press, 1996. x, 218 pp. Paperback $19.95, isBN 0-8179-9422-x. Chae-Jin Lee has pulled together historical materials and interview data to produce a compact, yet highly informative, work on China's changing military, diplomatic, and economic relations with Korea. His book documents the drastic shifts in China's policies toward North and South Korea over the last half-century. Lee maintains that three considerations have determined much of the evolution of its policies: "(1) China's internal political developments and shifting policy priorities, especially in regard to ideology, security, and economy; (2) China's evolving perceptions of North Korean and South Korean intentions and capabilities; and (3) China's changing relations with the Soviet Union (Russia), the United States, and Japan" (p. 6; see also p. 169). The general argument is quite straightforward, but the author demonstrates powerfully through his cogent historical narrative the interactions between global and local forces. At the same time, he offers a number of specific and promising postulations. For instance, he argues that China's staunch support of Norm Korea can be explained by the presence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

China and Korea: Dynamic Relations (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

172 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. ?, Spring 1998 Chae-Jin Lee, in collaboration with Doo-Bok Park. China and Korea: Dynamic Relations. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press, 1996. x, 218 pp. Paperback $19.95, isBN 0-8179-9422-x. Chae-Jin Lee has pulled together historical materials and interview data to produce a compact, yet highly informative, work on China's changing military, diplomatic, and economic relations with Korea. His book documents the drastic shifts in China's policies toward North and South Korea over the last half-century. Lee maintains that three considerations have determined much of the evolution of its policies: "(1) China's internal political developments and shifting policy priorities, especially in regard to ideology, security, and economy; (2) China's evolving perceptions of North Korean and South Korean intentions and capabilities; and (3) China's changing relations with the Soviet Union (Russia), the United States, and Japan" (p. 6; see also p. 169). The general argument is quite straightforward, but the author demonstrates powerfully through his cogent historical narrative the interactions between global and local forces. At the same time, he offers a number of specific and promising postulations. For instance, he argues that China's staunch support of Norm Korea can be explained by the presence

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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