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Chamorro Historical Phonology

Chamorro Historical Phonology Chamorro Historical Phonology1 Robert Blust university of hawai`i After a brief look at the synchronic phonology of this language of the Mariana Islands, the details of its development from Proto-Austronesian are set forth. Questions of subgrouping within Austronesian and the original settlement of these islands are also considered. 1. BACKGROUND. Only two of the more than 450 Austronesian (An) languages spoken in the Paci²c region do not belong to the Oceanic subgroup. One of these is Palauan, the other Chamorro. The history of these languages differs markedly from that of other An languages in Micronesia, and from one another. Each appears to have arisen through separate migrations out of insular Southeast Asia some 3,500­4,000 years ago. Although the historical phonology of Chamorro has been mentioned in passing by various writers (Conant 1908, 1910; Dempwolff 1920; Dyen 1962; Dahl 1976:46ff.; Reid, to appear) and was treated at some length by Costenoble (1940) on the basis of reconstructed forms as they were then formulated, no fully adequate account has yet appeared. In fact, some features of Chamorro historical phonology, such as glide addition and fortition, have been persistently misunderstood. No one has looked at the ordering of historical changes in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Chamorro Historical Phonology

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 6, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
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Abstract

Chamorro Historical Phonology1 Robert Blust university of hawai`i After a brief look at the synchronic phonology of this language of the Mariana Islands, the details of its development from Proto-Austronesian are set forth. Questions of subgrouping within Austronesian and the original settlement of these islands are also considered. 1. BACKGROUND. Only two of the more than 450 Austronesian (An) languages spoken in the Paci²c region do not belong to the Oceanic subgroup. One of these is Palauan, the other Chamorro. The history of these languages differs markedly from that of other An languages in Micronesia, and from one another. Each appears to have arisen through separate migrations out of insular Southeast Asia some 3,500­4,000 years ago. Although the historical phonology of Chamorro has been mentioned in passing by various writers (Conant 1908, 1910; Dempwolff 1920; Dyen 1962; Dahl 1976:46ff.; Reid, to appear) and was treated at some length by Costenoble (1940) on the basis of reconstructed forms as they were then formulated, no fully adequate account has yet appeared. In fact, some features of Chamorro historical phonology, such as glide addition and fortition, have been persistently misunderstood. No one has looked at the ordering of historical changes in

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 6, 2000

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