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Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Mei (review)

Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Mei (review) Reviews 487 Spirits of Chinese Religion"--meant literally--I would rather have seen as "The Spirit of Chinese Religion," for nowhere is Chinese religion per se introduced. In essence, the Introduction, which is crucial for an anthology of this sort, is an interesting mélange of scholarly digressions but does not seem actually to have been written for the volume it introduces. This is always a potential problem when the introduction to an anthology is written by someone other than the editor. Religions ofChina in Practiceis excellent for a graduate course on Chinese religion but may be found less than suitable for an undergraduate course. Assuming such a course would utilize one of the (unfortunately) very few good introductory texts on Chinese religion, it would be very difficult for an instructor, unless very familiar with the study of Chinese religion, to coordinate this anthology with one of these introductory texts. The problem is exacerbated by the lack of a real introduction. Jordan Paper York University Jordan Paper is an associate professor in the East Asian and Religious Studies Programs at York University. IiE Kam Louie and Louise Edwards, editors and translators. Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Met. Armonk, New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Mei (review)

China Review International , Volume 4 (2) – Mar 30, 1997

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 487 Spirits of Chinese Religion"--meant literally--I would rather have seen as "The Spirit of Chinese Religion," for nowhere is Chinese religion per se introduced. In essence, the Introduction, which is crucial for an anthology of this sort, is an interesting mélange of scholarly digressions but does not seem actually to have been written for the volume it introduces. This is always a potential problem when the introduction to an anthology is written by someone other than the editor. Religions ofChina in Practiceis excellent for a graduate course on Chinese religion but may be found less than suitable for an undergraduate course. Assuming such a course would utilize one of the (unfortunately) very few good introductory texts on Chinese religion, it would be very difficult for an instructor, unless very familiar with the study of Chinese religion, to coordinate this anthology with one of these introductory texts. The problem is exacerbated by the lack of a real introduction. Jordan Paper York University Jordan Paper is an associate professor in the East Asian and Religious Studies Programs at York University. IiE Kam Louie and Louise Edwards, editors and translators. Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Met. Armonk, New

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1997

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