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Cave Sites in Northeastern Luzon, Philippines: A Preliminary Soil Micromorphological Study

Cave Sites in Northeastern Luzon, Philippines: A Preliminary Soil Micromorphological Study Abstract: Soil micromorphology was among the approaches used to explore site formation in two cave sites in northern Luzon: Eme and Dalan Serkot Caves. Interplay of biogenic, sedimentary, and anthropogenic processes worked and reworked the archaeological sediments at both sites. Eme Cave was found to be highly bioturbated by faunal activities and shrink-swell processes, and caution is needed in interpreting its archaeological contexts. However, thin section study revealed wood ash and possible burnt soil fragments, along with charcoal, attesting to later prehistoric burning activity at the site at some time. In Dalan Serkot Cave, along with standard cave sediments a volcanic ash deposit was identified, apparently deposited before 6200 B.P. , that must have affected local communities, and that could be used as a stratigraphic marker for future research in the area. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Cave Sites in Northeastern Luzon, Philippines: A Preliminary Soil Micromorphological Study

Asian Perspectives , Volume 48 (1) – Aug 7, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1535-8283
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Abstract

Abstract: Soil micromorphology was among the approaches used to explore site formation in two cave sites in northern Luzon: Eme and Dalan Serkot Caves. Interplay of biogenic, sedimentary, and anthropogenic processes worked and reworked the archaeological sediments at both sites. Eme Cave was found to be highly bioturbated by faunal activities and shrink-swell processes, and caution is needed in interpreting its archaeological contexts. However, thin section study revealed wood ash and possible burnt soil fragments, along with charcoal, attesting to later prehistoric burning activity at the site at some time. In Dalan Serkot Cave, along with standard cave sediments a volcanic ash deposit was identified, apparently deposited before 6200 B.P. , that must have affected local communities, and that could be used as a stratigraphic marker for future research in the area.

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2009

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