Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles (review)

Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles (review) 132KOREAN STUDIES, VOL. 22 annexation" were instrumental in sustaining ethnically distinct Korean business associations (133). This distinction is further highlighted in chapter 7, which focuses on the controversy that hit the Jinsen Grain Exchange ('Jinto') in 1919. As he puts it, the controversy "offers initial evidence of organization and ideologies among emerging interest groups necessary for social mobilization in civil society" (156). The final chapter brings together a number concepts that inform and underlie this research: incorporation, state and society, and comparative colonialism. Overall, McNamara's book is an important and valuable contribution both to the literature on Korean colonialism and on Korean development since Liberation. His research demonstrates clearly, if not unequivocally the need to broaden our field of vision, to look to the local level in order to fully understand large-scale social change and transformation. It also augments our understanding of colonial precedents, and their effect on patterns of state-society relations in the post-liberation period. This said, McNamara's work suffers from one serious drawback: simply put, it is extremely difficult to read. Nowhere, for example, does the author clearly lay out his argument (despite an effort to do so on pages 12-16). In seeking to get a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles (review)

Korean Studies, Volume 22 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1529-1529
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Abstract

132KOREAN STUDIES, VOL. 22 annexation" were instrumental in sustaining ethnically distinct Korean business associations (133). This distinction is further highlighted in chapter 7, which focuses on the controversy that hit the Jinsen Grain Exchange ('Jinto') in 1919. As he puts it, the controversy "offers initial evidence of organization and ideologies among emerging interest groups necessary for social mobilization in civil society" (156). The final chapter brings together a number concepts that inform and underlie this research: incorporation, state and society, and comparative colonialism. Overall, McNamara's book is an important and valuable contribution both to the literature on Korean colonialism and on Korean development since Liberation. His research demonstrates clearly, if not unequivocally the need to broaden our field of vision, to look to the local level in order to fully understand large-scale social change and transformation. It also augments our understanding of colonial precedents, and their effect on patterns of state-society relations in the post-liberation period. This said, McNamara's work suffers from one serious drawback: simply put, it is extremely difficult to read. Nowhere, for example, does the author clearly lay out his argument (despite an effort to do so on pages 12-16). In seeking to get a

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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