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Canning Paradise by Olivier Pollet (review)

Canning Paradise by Olivier Pollet (review) the contemporary pacific 26:1 (2014) try who of course declined to participate. No matter. The absent voice of the latter inheres in their raw action, here seen in overfishing, polluting, abusing labor, and manipulating local elites, all with the goal of building a maquiladora, a free-trade zone for its profit and purposes in Madang town. Canning Paradise is made up of a great many voices, but to what extent is this dialogue open-ended? To what extent is it unfinalized? The catastrophe of depleted nearshore fish stocks, the pollution of the urban bay, the threat of forced relocation of a small island community that willy-nilly finds itself located smack in the middle of the free-trade zone, and the exploitation of labor are all portrayed poignantly and staggeringly without mawkish romanticism. What stand out are the local people resisting the tuna industry and its maquiladora. They lodge angry protests against land alienation in the interest of the new free-trade zone and speak unequivocally of their multivalent commitments to the resources on which their livelihoods depend, the land and the sea. But all they have are their voices. They certainly lack official legal and political support, as well as support from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Canning Paradise by Olivier Pollet (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 26 (1) – Mar 12, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific 26:1 (2014) try who of course declined to participate. No matter. The absent voice of the latter inheres in their raw action, here seen in overfishing, polluting, abusing labor, and manipulating local elites, all with the goal of building a maquiladora, a free-trade zone for its profit and purposes in Madang town. Canning Paradise is made up of a great many voices, but to what extent is this dialogue open-ended? To what extent is it unfinalized? The catastrophe of depleted nearshore fish stocks, the pollution of the urban bay, the threat of forced relocation of a small island community that willy-nilly finds itself located smack in the middle of the free-trade zone, and the exploitation of labor are all portrayed poignantly and staggeringly without mawkish romanticism. What stand out are the local people resisting the tuna industry and its maquiladora. They lodge angry protests against land alienation in the interest of the new free-trade zone and speak unequivocally of their multivalent commitments to the resources on which their livelihoods depend, the land and the sea. But all they have are their voices. They certainly lack official legal and political support, as well as support from

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 12, 2014

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