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Buddhist Peacework: Creating Cultures of Peace (review)

Buddhist Peacework: Creating Cultures of Peace (review) BCS 21 pp. i-viii, 1-164 12/5/01 6:24 PM Page 155 BOOK REVIEWS 155 BUDDHIST PE ACEWORK: CRE ATING CULTURES OF PE ACE . Edited by David W. Chappell. Somerville, Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications, 1999. 253 pp. This earnest book demonstrates the continuing vitality of Buddhism in many parts of the world. The contributing authors are the leading figures of contemporary engaged Buddhism, and they write from firsthand experience. The Dalai Lama out- lines methods for promoting harmony among different religious traditions. Thich Nhat Hanh shows how the principle of nonviolence was tested in the rescue of Viet- namese boat people during the 1970s. A. T. Ariyaratne presents the work of the influ- ential Sarvodaya movement in Sri Lanka. Shih Cheng-yen, sometimes called “the Mother Theresa of Asia,” describes the relief work of Tzu Chi, the largest charitable organization in Taiwan. Dhammachari Lokamitra documents the impact of an adopted Buddhism among former “untouchables” in India. Robert Aitken surveys engaged Buddhist activity in North America, including hospice work, prison reform, and sustainable farming. Many of the writers have personally suffered the depriva- tions of war and oppression; in some cases they continue their work amid threats of violence or arrest. An aim http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhist Peacework: Creating Cultures of Peace (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 21 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

BCS 21 pp. i-viii, 1-164 12/5/01 6:24 PM Page 155 BOOK REVIEWS 155 BUDDHIST PE ACEWORK: CRE ATING CULTURES OF PE ACE . Edited by David W. Chappell. Somerville, Massachusetts: Wisdom Publications, 1999. 253 pp. This earnest book demonstrates the continuing vitality of Buddhism in many parts of the world. The contributing authors are the leading figures of contemporary engaged Buddhism, and they write from firsthand experience. The Dalai Lama out- lines methods for promoting harmony among different religious traditions. Thich Nhat Hanh shows how the principle of nonviolence was tested in the rescue of Viet- namese boat people during the 1970s. A. T. Ariyaratne presents the work of the influ- ential Sarvodaya movement in Sri Lanka. Shih Cheng-yen, sometimes called “the Mother Theresa of Asia,” describes the relief work of Tzu Chi, the largest charitable organization in Taiwan. Dhammachari Lokamitra documents the impact of an adopted Buddhism among former “untouchables” in India. Robert Aitken surveys engaged Buddhist activity in North America, including hospice work, prison reform, and sustainable farming. Many of the writers have personally suffered the depriva- tions of war and oppression; in some cases they continue their work amid threats of violence or arrest. An aim

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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