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Buddhist Learning and Textual Practice in Eighteenth-Century Lankan Monastic Culture (review)

Buddhist Learning and Textual Practice in Eighteenth-Century Lankan Monastic Culture (review) BOOK REV IEWS teachers, monasticism, lay involvement, religious pluralism, and dialogue with our Buddhist peers in Asia and around the world may enfold in an empowering way. We are challenged, however, by the powerful draw of materialism and the media, by the potentially ungrounding effects of freedom to choose in the spiritual supermarket, and by our own youth and inexperience. We are further asked to think carefully about the effects of globalization, creation of institutions, not isolating ourselves from the previous generation, and balancing tradition with creating anew. All these concerns are important, very important, yet they were written before the spiritual, social, and economic cataclysm of September 11, 2001, and the ensuing ruptures and reconsiderations of our way of life and freedoms in America. The complexities, extremisms, and follies of Judeo-Christian-Muslim societies must be understood and accommodated by new, Western Buddhists. These sensitive young people, perhaps more so than others, are aware of our global "inter-being," our intense, ecological interdependency and shared suffering and inevitable death. I look forward to Ms. Loundon's next volume, since it must address very different and compelling global issues than concerned her first group of contributors. Readers interested in reading more about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhist Learning and Textual Practice in Eighteenth-Century Lankan Monastic Culture (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 23 (1) – Oct 29, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REV IEWS teachers, monasticism, lay involvement, religious pluralism, and dialogue with our Buddhist peers in Asia and around the world may enfold in an empowering way. We are challenged, however, by the powerful draw of materialism and the media, by the potentially ungrounding effects of freedom to choose in the spiritual supermarket, and by our own youth and inexperience. We are further asked to think carefully about the effects of globalization, creation of institutions, not isolating ourselves from the previous generation, and balancing tradition with creating anew. All these concerns are important, very important, yet they were written before the spiritual, social, and economic cataclysm of September 11, 2001, and the ensuing ruptures and reconsiderations of our way of life and freedoms in America. The complexities, extremisms, and follies of Judeo-Christian-Muslim societies must be understood and accommodated by new, Western Buddhists. These sensitive young people, perhaps more so than others, are aware of our global "inter-being," our intense, ecological interdependency and shared suffering and inevitable death. I look forward to Ms. Loundon's next volume, since it must address very different and compelling global issues than concerned her first group of contributors. Readers interested in reading more about

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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