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Buddhist Inclusivism: Attitudes Towards Religious Others (review)

Buddhist Inclusivism: Attitudes Towards Religious Others (review) Jinsai , in Nihon no meicho , vol. 13 (Tokyo: Chuo Koron, 1973), ¯¯ ¯ pp. 36­443. 5 ­ A modern edition of Jinsai's Gomo jigi is in Yoshikawa Kojiro and Shimizu ¯ ¯ ¯ Shigeru , eds., Ito Jinsai/Ito Togai /, Nihon shiso taikei ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ , vol. 33 (Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1985), pp. 11­168. For a translation, see John A. Tucker, trans., Ito Jinsai's Gomo jigi and the Philosophical Definition of Early-Modern ¯ ¯ Japan (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998). Buddhist Inclusivism: Attitudes Towards Religious Others. By Kristin Beise Kiblinger. London and New York: Ashgate Publishing, 2005. Pp. 145. Hardcover. Reviewed by Robert C. Gordon University of Oregon In this era of recrudescent religious strife, any book is welcome that contributes to interfaith dialogue. This is especially true if that book does so from the perspective of Buddhism, since it has historically paid little attention to this increasingly important topic. Kristin Beise Kiblinger's Buddhist Inclusivism is such a book, and it is an exemplary addition to the cross-cultural discussion on ecumenism. At first blush, it is somewhat puzzling that Buddhists have done little work in this area because, as Kiblinger points out, ``there is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhist Inclusivism: Attitudes Towards Religious Others (review)

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Abstract

Jinsai , in Nihon no meicho , vol. 13 (Tokyo: Chuo Koron, 1973), ¯¯ ¯ pp. 36­443. 5 ­ A modern edition of Jinsai's Gomo jigi is in Yoshikawa Kojiro and Shimizu ¯ ¯ ¯ Shigeru , eds., Ito Jinsai/Ito Togai /, Nihon shiso taikei ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ , vol. 33 (Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1985), pp. 11­168. For a translation, see John A. Tucker, trans., Ito Jinsai's Gomo jigi and the Philosophical Definition of Early-Modern ¯ ¯ Japan (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1998). Buddhist Inclusivism: Attitudes Towards Religious Others. By Kristin Beise Kiblinger. London and New York: Ashgate Publishing, 2005. Pp. 145. Hardcover. Reviewed by Robert C. Gordon University of Oregon In this era of recrudescent religious strife, any book is welcome that contributes to interfaith dialogue. This is especially true if that book does so from the perspective of Buddhism, since it has historically paid little attention to this increasingly important topic. Kristin Beise Kiblinger's Buddhist Inclusivism is such a book, and it is an exemplary addition to the cross-cultural discussion on ecumenism. At first blush, it is somewhat puzzling that Buddhists have done little work in this area because, as Kiblinger points out, ``there is

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 17, 2009

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