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Buddhist? Christian? Both? Neither?

Buddhist? Christian? Both? Neither? DUAL BELONGING / PERSONAL JOURNEYS Ruben L. F. Habito Perkins School of Theology An expanded version of this article will appear in a book, Beside Still Waters: Jews, Christians, and the Way of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2003). I was in my early twenties when I was introduced to Zen practice, under the guid- ance of Zen Master Yamada Koun, less than a year after I had arrived in Japan as a Jesuit seminarian preparing for ordination to the priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church. My earlier Jesuit training in the Philippines had already initiated me into the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, a monthlong rigorous program of meditative and contemplative practice that culminates in what is known as the Contemplatio ad Amorem. This is a feature of the exercises whereby one simply basks in the presence of that Divine Love that undergirds each and every element in this universe. This practice brings the exercitant right at the core of the very mystical experience of Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus. Each Jesuit undergoes these exer- cises soon after entry into the order, and is thereby oriented to a form of spiritual practice that can nourish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhist? Christian? Both? Neither?

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

DUAL BELONGING / PERSONAL JOURNEYS Ruben L. F. Habito Perkins School of Theology An expanded version of this article will appear in a book, Beside Still Waters: Jews, Christians, and the Way of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2003). I was in my early twenties when I was introduced to Zen practice, under the guid- ance of Zen Master Yamada Koun, less than a year after I had arrived in Japan as a Jesuit seminarian preparing for ordination to the priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church. My earlier Jesuit training in the Philippines had already initiated me into the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, a monthlong rigorous program of meditative and contemplative practice that culminates in what is known as the Contemplatio ad Amorem. This is a feature of the exercises whereby one simply basks in the presence of that Divine Love that undergirds each and every element in this universe. This practice brings the exercitant right at the core of the very mystical experience of Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus. Each Jesuit undergoes these exer- cises soon after entry into the order, and is thereby oriented to a form of spiritual practice that can nourish

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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