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Buddhist and Christian Responses to the Kowtow Problem in China by Eric Reinders (review)

Buddhist and Christian Responses to the Kowtow Problem in China by Eric Reinders (review) BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN STUDIES After this lengthy excursus on three figures from the Kyoto school, Valea turns to John Cobb (b. 1925), whose criticism of traditional Christian theology echoes some of the suggestions from these Japanese thinkers. Cobb's understanding of the divine as a process appears to be closer to the Zen notion of emptiness than to the claims of thinkers such as Aquinas or the Cappadocian Fathers. Cobb is also quite critical of traditional Buddhism, which in his opinion lacks a sense of history and a real interest in social justice (p. 186). Valea uses his discussion on Cobb to segue into the last chapter of the volume, which comprises his actual exploration of comparative theology. This section touches on a variety of different themes, such as compassion, the relationship between the Orthodox Jesus prayer and the Shin Buddhist Nembutsu, and the role of faith. After the earlier discussion of pluralism and multiple religious belonging, it is not surprising that Valea should acknowledge the analogies between the two traditions' beliefs and practices, but should also stress the irreducible difference between their underlying worldviews. In his words, "other traditions have the role of inviting one to reflect on the weaknesses http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhist and Christian Responses to the Kowtow Problem in China by Eric Reinders (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 36 – Oct 10, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BUDDHIST-CHRISTIAN STUDIES After this lengthy excursus on three figures from the Kyoto school, Valea turns to John Cobb (b. 1925), whose criticism of traditional Christian theology echoes some of the suggestions from these Japanese thinkers. Cobb's understanding of the divine as a process appears to be closer to the Zen notion of emptiness than to the claims of thinkers such as Aquinas or the Cappadocian Fathers. Cobb is also quite critical of traditional Buddhism, which in his opinion lacks a sense of history and a real interest in social justice (p. 186). Valea uses his discussion on Cobb to segue into the last chapter of the volume, which comprises his actual exploration of comparative theology. This section touches on a variety of different themes, such as compassion, the relationship between the Orthodox Jesus prayer and the Shin Buddhist Nembutsu, and the role of faith. After the earlier discussion of pluralism and multiple religious belonging, it is not surprising that Valea should acknowledge the analogies between the two traditions' beliefs and practices, but should also stress the irreducible difference between their underlying worldviews. In his words, "other traditions have the role of inviting one to reflect on the weaknesses

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2016

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