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Buddhism in America, and: Luminous Passage: The Practice and Study of Buddhism in America (review)

Buddhism in America, and: Luminous Passage: The Practice and Study of Buddhism in America (review) BOOK REVIEWS their methodological perspectives, which is understandable because they are engaged in a very difficult hermeneutical problem: Just how can Pure Land Buddhist thought and practice be relevant for contemporary persons? But faithful Pure Land Buddhists are not the only religious people faced with this hermeneutical problem. Christians too must wrestle with the relevance of traditional forms of thought and practice for contemporary existence, which is why Kaufman and Cobb were asked to respond to the Buddhist writers; each suggest ways in which the three approaches of the Buddhist essayists might be grasped as distinct points on a continuum, but Hirota, Yokota, and Tachikawa do not employ this suggestion in their responses to Kaufman and Cobb. This fact should not be read as a negative criticism of the Buddhist essayists. Yet it strikes me that Buddhist practice of something like the "Protestant Principle" is a rather new form of contemporary Buddhist selfcriticism. As in Christian tradition, a number of forms of renewal and self-criticism are usually at work in theological reflection, no one of which can be said to be final and complete. In other words, the practice of the Protestant principle in Christian circles is pluralistic, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhism in America, and: Luminous Passage: The Practice and Study of Buddhism in America (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 22 (1) – Nov 8, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS their methodological perspectives, which is understandable because they are engaged in a very difficult hermeneutical problem: Just how can Pure Land Buddhist thought and practice be relevant for contemporary persons? But faithful Pure Land Buddhists are not the only religious people faced with this hermeneutical problem. Christians too must wrestle with the relevance of traditional forms of thought and practice for contemporary existence, which is why Kaufman and Cobb were asked to respond to the Buddhist writers; each suggest ways in which the three approaches of the Buddhist essayists might be grasped as distinct points on a continuum, but Hirota, Yokota, and Tachikawa do not employ this suggestion in their responses to Kaufman and Cobb. This fact should not be read as a negative criticism of the Buddhist essayists. Yet it strikes me that Buddhist practice of something like the "Protestant Principle" is a rather new form of contemporary Buddhist selfcriticism. As in Christian tradition, a number of forms of renewal and self-criticism are usually at work in theological reflection, no one of which can be said to be final and complete. In other words, the practice of the Protestant principle in Christian circles is pluralistic,

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 8, 2002

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