Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Buddhism, Christianity, and Modern Science: A Response to Masao Abe

Buddhism, Christianity, and Modern Science: A Response to Masao Abe ESSAYS Frank Fair Sam Houston State University After number of years of teaching philosophy of science, a few years ago I took up the challenge of teaching philosophy of religion. As one might imagine, it has always seemed to me to be important that our religious convictions harmonize with our best scientific knowledge of how the world works, and this became a more interesting issue when the change in my teaching assignment brought me into contact with the work of Masao Abe, the eminent Japanese Buddhist scholar. His essay "Religion and Science in the Global Age--Their Essential Character and Mutual Relationship" (Abe 1985: 241­248) challenged me to expand my thinking to consider not only how theistic religions such as Christianity relate to science, but also to consider how nontheistic religions, such as Buddhism, might fare when interacting with modern science. In his essay on religion and science Abe expressed his agreement with the thought of Keiji Nishitani in this way: 1. It is necessary for each religion to re-examine the basis of its world view. For any religion its world view is not like clothes that one can change whenever one pleases. A world view is to religion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhism, Christianity, and Modern Science: A Response to Masao Abe

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Oct 10, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/buddhism-christianity-and-modern-science-a-response-to-masao-abe-mxLAYtiXjW
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ESSAYS Frank Fair Sam Houston State University After number of years of teaching philosophy of science, a few years ago I took up the challenge of teaching philosophy of religion. As one might imagine, it has always seemed to me to be important that our religious convictions harmonize with our best scientific knowledge of how the world works, and this became a more interesting issue when the change in my teaching assignment brought me into contact with the work of Masao Abe, the eminent Japanese Buddhist scholar. His essay "Religion and Science in the Global Age--Their Essential Character and Mutual Relationship" (Abe 1985: 241­248) challenged me to expand my thinking to consider not only how theistic religions such as Christianity relate to science, but also to consider how nontheistic religions, such as Buddhism, might fare when interacting with modern science. In his essay on religion and science Abe expressed his agreement with the thought of Keiji Nishitani in this way: 1. It is necessary for each religion to re-examine the basis of its world view. For any religion its world view is not like clothes that one can change whenever one pleases. A world view is to religion

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2005

There are no references for this article.