Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Buddhism and the Idea of Human Rights: Resonances and Dissonances

Buddhism and the Idea of Human Rights: Resonances and Dissonances COMPARATIVE ETHICS : Resonances and Dissonances 1 Perry Schmidt-Leukel University of Glasgow In 1991 L.P.N. Perera, Professor of Päli and Buddhist Studies in Sri Lanka, published a Buddhist commentary on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In this commentary Perera tries to show that, in the Päli canon, i.e. the canonical scripture of Theraväda Buddhism, for every single article of the Human Rights Declaration a substantial parallel or at least a statement with a similar tendency can be found. Indeed, says Perera, Article 1, which affirms the dignity and rights of all humans, "is in complete accord with Buddhist thought, and may be said to be nothing new to Buddhism in conception" (Perera 1991:21). In contrast, the Buddhist Peter Junger, Professor of Law at the University of Cleveland, Ohio, judged in 1995 that . . . though followers of Buddhist traditions do value most, if not all, of the interests underlying the rhetoric of human rights, they may not have much use for the label itself, which is, after all, a product of the traditions of Western Europe and the parochial histories of that region. (Junger 1998: 56) Junger goes on to say that "the concept of human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhism and the Idea of Human Rights: Resonances and Dissonances

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 26 (1) – Nov 6, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/buddhism-and-the-idea-of-human-rights-resonances-and-dissonances-AmmZK6B0kb
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMPARATIVE ETHICS : Resonances and Dissonances 1 Perry Schmidt-Leukel University of Glasgow In 1991 L.P.N. Perera, Professor of Päli and Buddhist Studies in Sri Lanka, published a Buddhist commentary on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In this commentary Perera tries to show that, in the Päli canon, i.e. the canonical scripture of Theraväda Buddhism, for every single article of the Human Rights Declaration a substantial parallel or at least a statement with a similar tendency can be found. Indeed, says Perera, Article 1, which affirms the dignity and rights of all humans, "is in complete accord with Buddhist thought, and may be said to be nothing new to Buddhism in conception" (Perera 1991:21). In contrast, the Buddhist Peter Junger, Professor of Law at the University of Cleveland, Ohio, judged in 1995 that . . . though followers of Buddhist traditions do value most, if not all, of the interests underlying the rhetoric of human rights, they may not have much use for the label itself, which is, after all, a product of the traditions of Western Europe and the parochial histories of that region. (Junger 1998: 56) Junger goes on to say that "the concept of human

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 6, 2006

There are no references for this article.