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Buddhism and Deconstruction: Toward a Comparative Semiotics (review)

Buddhism and Deconstruction: Toward a Comparative Semiotics (review) But what about this word ``blandness''? Is it the right one? I do not think so. As developed in this book blandness is a ``stand-in'' for many other words that convey ÂÅ similar if not identical experiences: dao, sunyata, wu. One could extend the list. Å Furthermore there is the evident fact that blandness carries with it a very negative connotation. Jesus said ``because you are neither hot nor cold I will vomit you out of my mouth.'' Powerful words! How would one go about praising the bland? Would that not make it into something quite different? One thinks of other words: kind, open, quiet, generous, non-insistent, gentle, considerate, humane, caring. As I said at the beginning, this is a book that beguiles and irritates. One is educated by this work, but one is also frustrated. The final chapter is titled ``Transcendence is Natural.'' Here blandness is identified with neutrality and is described as a totality that is not yet divided up. I am reminded of Zhuangzi's hundun, whose transcendent hospitality brings immanent death. At the end of this work blandness is seen as a virtue. It is also called the insipid. What is not insipid in Jullien's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Buddhism and Deconstruction: Toward a Comparative Semiotics (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 55 (3) – Jul 7, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
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Abstract

But what about this word ``blandness''? Is it the right one? I do not think so. As developed in this book blandness is a ``stand-in'' for many other words that convey ÂÅ similar if not identical experiences: dao, sunyata, wu. One could extend the list. Å Furthermore there is the evident fact that blandness carries with it a very negative connotation. Jesus said ``because you are neither hot nor cold I will vomit you out of my mouth.'' Powerful words! How would one go about praising the bland? Would that not make it into something quite different? One thinks of other words: kind, open, quiet, generous, non-insistent, gentle, considerate, humane, caring. As I said at the beginning, this is a book that beguiles and irritates. One is educated by this work, but one is also frustrated. The final chapter is titled ``Transcendence is Natural.'' Here blandness is identified with neutrality and is described as a totality that is not yet divided up. I am reminded of Zhuangzi's hundun, whose transcendent hospitality brings immanent death. At the end of this work blandness is seen as a virtue. It is also called the insipid. What is not insipid in Jullien's

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 7, 2005

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