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Bubonic Plague in Nineteenth-Century China (review)

Bubonic Plague in Nineteenth-Century China (review) 6o China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 with that relate specifically to a given country's social and economic future, and relevant questions are brought to the attention of the reader. Another major strength is the book's focus on globalization. The analysis shows that each country is not independent but tied to the others by economic interchange, and the repercussions of any specific event in one country can be felt throughout the world. All of these strengths make Asian Development Outlook 1996 and 1997 both interesting and informative. There are also weaknesses. Historical background is not provided for any of the countries discussed, and the book would have been improved by the inclusion of some information on social issues in these countries. Since the text is technical, readers are expected to have a good understanding of economics. There are many abbreviations throughout, which hinders reading; however, the additional pages with definitions, abbreviations, and acronyms are helpful. In summary, Asia remains the fastest growing region in the world, and this book will be useful to those who are interested in studying both the world economy and the economic progress of developing member countries in the Asia-Pacific region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Bubonic Plague in Nineteenth-Century China (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
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Abstract

6o China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 with that relate specifically to a given country's social and economic future, and relevant questions are brought to the attention of the reader. Another major strength is the book's focus on globalization. The analysis shows that each country is not independent but tied to the others by economic interchange, and the repercussions of any specific event in one country can be felt throughout the world. All of these strengths make Asian Development Outlook 1996 and 1997 both interesting and informative. There are also weaknesses. Historical background is not provided for any of the countries discussed, and the book would have been improved by the inclusion of some information on social issues in these countries. Since the text is technical, readers are expected to have a good understanding of economics. There are many abbreviations throughout, which hinders reading; however, the additional pages with definitions, abbreviations, and acronyms are helpful. In summary, Asia remains the fastest growing region in the world, and this book will be useful to those who are interested in studying both the world economy and the economic progress of developing member countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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