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Bringing the World Home: Appropriating the West in Late Qing and Early Republican China (review)

Bringing the World Home: Appropriating the West in Late Qing and Early Republican China (review) journal of world history, december 2005 inequality between 1700 and 1973 and ignores the puzzling increase in income inequality in the United States in the last thirty years. Equally puzzling is the choice, in Figure 3.3 (p. 58), to compare modern perinatal death rates in Ghana, India, and the United States with data from the 1960s or the discussion on China's prospects relying on U.S. data. Chapter 3 applies this techno-physiological theory to problems that affect health, mortality, and the accumulation of physiological capital in nonindustrial countries. Some of the intriguing ideas mentioned in this part are the synergic relationship between urbanization, health, and economic development (and the difference in the effect of urbanization today and in the nineteenth century), comparisons of caloric intakes between current developing countries and the European experience in previous centuries, or the health impact of perinatal nutrition and the consequent impact on stunting, wasting, disease prevalence, and mortality risks. Chapter 4 goes on to speculate on future trends in leisure and work habits. Chapter 5 discusses health care provision in both developing and industrial countries, and a postscript speculates about future trends in life expectancy. These chapters are the least innovative and leave http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Bringing the World Home: Appropriating the West in Late Qing and Early Republican China (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 16 (4)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2005 inequality between 1700 and 1973 and ignores the puzzling increase in income inequality in the United States in the last thirty years. Equally puzzling is the choice, in Figure 3.3 (p. 58), to compare modern perinatal death rates in Ghana, India, and the United States with data from the 1960s or the discussion on China's prospects relying on U.S. data. Chapter 3 applies this techno-physiological theory to problems that affect health, mortality, and the accumulation of physiological capital in nonindustrial countries. Some of the intriguing ideas mentioned in this part are the synergic relationship between urbanization, health, and economic development (and the difference in the effect of urbanization today and in the nineteenth century), comparisons of caloric intakes between current developing countries and the European experience in previous centuries, or the health impact of perinatal nutrition and the consequent impact on stunting, wasting, disease prevalence, and mortality risks. Chapter 4 goes on to speculate on future trends in leisure and work habits. Chapter 5 discusses health care provision in both developing and industrial countries, and a postscript speculates about future trends in life expectancy. These chapters are the least innovative and leave

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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