Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Bringing Class and Indigeneity In, but Leaving Japaneseness Out

Bringing Class and Indigeneity In, but Leaving Japaneseness Out Ritsumeikan University Jeffrey Paul Bayliss. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013. 437 pp. $45 (cloth). Mark K. Watson. Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics. New York: Routledge. 189 pp. $145 (cloth). Buoyed by waves of labor migration into Japan from Asia and Latin America, the field of Japan studies has seen a renewed interest in Japan's minority groups. Much of the new scholarship has focused on debunking notions of Japanese uniqueness found in political discourse about the nation, known as Nihonjinron. In particular, this work has focused on Japan's supposed ethnic, racial, and class homogeneity, examining the experiences of newcomers, oldcomers, and native others in Japan. From this academic work, two key analytical foci--social class and indigeneity--have tended to be missing. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan, by Jeffrey Paul Bayliss, and Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics, by Mark K. Watson, address this shortcoming in their respective analyses of Burakumin and Koreans from the Meiji Restoration to the end of World War II, and of present-day Ainu http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

Bringing Class and Indigeneity In, but Leaving Japaneseness Out

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/bringing-class-and-indigeneity-in-but-leaving-japaneseness-out-PKg3emu2Ix
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9674
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ritsumeikan University Jeffrey Paul Bayliss. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2013. 437 pp. $45 (cloth). Mark K. Watson. Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics. New York: Routledge. 189 pp. $145 (cloth). Buoyed by waves of labor migration into Japan from Asia and Latin America, the field of Japan studies has seen a renewed interest in Japan's minority groups. Much of the new scholarship has focused on debunking notions of Japanese uniqueness found in political discourse about the nation, known as Nihonjinron. In particular, this work has focused on Japan's supposed ethnic, racial, and class homogeneity, examining the experiences of newcomers, oldcomers, and native others in Japan. From this academic work, two key analytical foci--social class and indigeneity--have tended to be missing. On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan, by Jeffrey Paul Bayliss, and Japan's Ainu Minority in Tokyo: Diasporic Indigeneity and Urban Politics, by Mark K. Watson, address this shortcoming in their respective analyses of Burakumin and Koreans from the Meiji Restoration to the end of World War II, and of present-day Ainu

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 20, 2015

There are no references for this article.