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Bravo for the Marshallese: Regaining Control in a Post-Nuclear, Post-Colonial World (review)

Bravo for the Marshallese: Regaining Control in a Post-Nuclear, Post-Colonial World (review) grounded in a notion of capital, then, made analytical connections between phenomena that were not apparent prior to analysis. This is what we meant by critique. . . . In this respect, the transition to a `mode of information' is indeed disorienting: the academic response to information is not class analysis, not even network analysis, but networking. . . . Academic analysis has become an instantiation, a making evident of academic networks" (113). There are some exceedingly tautological moments in this work, but it is engaging nevertheless in its demonstration of fluency with a range of European and American philosophical, political, analytical, and cultural canons and concepts, and in its unnerving representation of intimacy with key figures in Pacific academic, activist, ngo, and family networks. What is curious in light of the last quote above is that in her preface the author pointedly disarticulates her own scholarship from the "network" of Pacific Studies, stating that her book's "contribution to the ethnography of the Pacific region lies in fragmentary resonances rather than overarching models or positions in debates" (xvi). Is this humility? Or disdain? Or, like Baudrillard's double hologram (which Riles cites [27]), is the answer that, in seeing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Bravo for the Marshallese: Regaining Control in a Post-Nuclear, Post-Colonial World (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 16 (2) – Aug 31, 2004

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
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Abstract

grounded in a notion of capital, then, made analytical connections between phenomena that were not apparent prior to analysis. This is what we meant by critique. . . . In this respect, the transition to a `mode of information' is indeed disorienting: the academic response to information is not class analysis, not even network analysis, but networking. . . . Academic analysis has become an instantiation, a making evident of academic networks" (113). There are some exceedingly tautological moments in this work, but it is engaging nevertheless in its demonstration of fluency with a range of European and American philosophical, political, analytical, and cultural canons and concepts, and in its unnerving representation of intimacy with key figures in Pacific academic, activist, ngo, and family networks. What is curious in light of the last quote above is that in her preface the author pointedly disarticulates her own scholarship from the "network" of Pacific Studies, stating that her book's "contribution to the ethnography of the Pacific region lies in fragmentary resonances rather than overarching models or positions in debates" (xvi). Is this humility? Or disdain? Or, like Baudrillard's double hologram (which Riles cites [27]), is the answer that, in seeing

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 31, 2004

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