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Bosavi: Rainforest Music from Papua New Guinea (review)

Bosavi: Rainforest Music from Papua New Guinea (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 music in P N G cities and towns have been decreasing due to the predominance of popular music cassettes of bands using electric instruments. In many remote areas, however, it seems that the popularity of string band music has been increasing with the spread of acoustic guitars. What Feld emphasizes on Disc I is that the Bosavi people's new way of song-making in string band music follows their traditional way of song-making, as when borrowing the words of ceremonial songs that strongly evoke memories of the deceased, and when singing a syllable that recalls the sung weeping of women's funerary lamentations. Having adopted the nonindigenous guitar-band musical style, the Bosavi people reflect in it their own music tradition. This seems to be a significant case that can clarify how music is disseminated, localized, and indigenized. Disc II: Sounds and Songs of Everyday Life aurally sketches the Bosavi's rich acoustic life, including sounds heard when felling trees and scraping sago pith; human voices singing with sounds of cicadas, waterfalls, and birds; and the sound of a Jew's harp played for self-entertainment, for example. Producing and listening to sounds are unquestionably at the center http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Bosavi: Rainforest Music from Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 music in P N G cities and towns have been decreasing due to the predominance of popular music cassettes of bands using electric instruments. In many remote areas, however, it seems that the popularity of string band music has been increasing with the spread of acoustic guitars. What Feld emphasizes on Disc I is that the Bosavi people's new way of song-making in string band music follows their traditional way of song-making, as when borrowing the words of ceremonial songs that strongly evoke memories of the deceased, and when singing a syllable that recalls the sung weeping of women's funerary lamentations. Having adopted the nonindigenous guitar-band musical style, the Bosavi people reflect in it their own music tradition. This seems to be a significant case that can clarify how music is disseminated, localized, and indigenized. Disc II: Sounds and Songs of Everyday Life aurally sketches the Bosavi's rich acoustic life, including sounds heard when felling trees and scraping sago pith; human voices singing with sounds of cicadas, waterfalls, and birds; and the sound of a Jew's harp played for self-entertainment, for example. Producing and listening to sounds are unquestionably at the center

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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