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Borrowing: A Pacific Perspective (review)

Borrowing: A Pacific Perspective (review) the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) beyond a doubt that it is indeed unfortunate we know so little about the nexus between Islanders and the sea. The Pacific is not the only place where foreigners have not listened long and carefully enough to what local people can tell them about the dance of life that those dwelling beside the ocean must lead to survive and prosper. In the late 1970s, the archaeologist Peter Bellwood published a pioneering survey of South Seas archaeology, titled Man's Conquest of the Pacific (1978). I have always felt this book was wrongly labeled for several reasons, starting with the obvious truth that the sea is not a beast that can be conquered. However, in the twentyfirst century it is painfully true that we now know the sea is a place that can be destroyed. Let us hope that it is not too late to learn about Oceania's particular needs and offerings. Readers of this book soon discover that D'Arcy has restricted the scope of his survey in two ways that may further disappoint them. He focuses his attention almost exclusively on Fiji, Polynesia, and Micronesia--here all somewhat misleadingly glossed as "Remote Oceania." He http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Borrowing: A Pacific Perspective (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) beyond a doubt that it is indeed unfortunate we know so little about the nexus between Islanders and the sea. The Pacific is not the only place where foreigners have not listened long and carefully enough to what local people can tell them about the dance of life that those dwelling beside the ocean must lead to survive and prosper. In the late 1970s, the archaeologist Peter Bellwood published a pioneering survey of South Seas archaeology, titled Man's Conquest of the Pacific (1978). I have always felt this book was wrongly labeled for several reasons, starting with the obvious truth that the sea is not a beast that can be conquered. However, in the twentyfirst century it is painfully true that we now know the sea is a place that can be destroyed. Let us hope that it is not too late to learn about Oceania's particular needs and offerings. Readers of this book soon discover that D'Arcy has restricted the scope of his survey in two ways that may further disappoint them. He focuses his attention almost exclusively on Fiji, Polynesia, and Micronesia--here all somewhat misleadingly glossed as "Remote Oceania." He

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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