Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Borderlands

Borderlands ANNA BA dk HEN e t Th railhead sits in the back of someone’s farm. The farmer, a ruddy man in knee-high Wellingtons, looks panicked when he first sees Iman ae ft r she halloes him from the gate, a mossy timber affair opposite a road sign that reads elderly people crossing, but when she explains her quest and asks for permission to pass through his land, he seems to relax and rearranges his face and says, “Aye then, jolly good.” He points uphill and says “byre.” Then he points to the low thick cloud spitting infinitesimal pinpricks of rain and says something that sounds like “roarie-bummlers” and then something else, maybe “plype,” that sounds benevolent, though she can’t really understand any of it. He stares at her too much. She can feel his gaze on her as she walks uphill, past the farmhouse and toward the cowshed, and she thinks that through the so ft pecking of drizzle on grass she hears him say “hot chocolate.” e Th night before, aer s ft he and Jim came down by bus from Edinburgh and checked into their mildewed eighteenth-century inn with rusty faucets and ivy-clasped walls, Iman walked a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Borderlands

Manoa , Volume 31 (2) – Dec 18, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/borderlands-0tLY27WHbC
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x

Abstract

ANNA BA dk HEN e t Th railhead sits in the back of someone’s farm. The farmer, a ruddy man in knee-high Wellingtons, looks panicked when he first sees Iman ae ft r she halloes him from the gate, a mossy timber affair opposite a road sign that reads elderly people crossing, but when she explains her quest and asks for permission to pass through his land, he seems to relax and rearranges his face and says, “Aye then, jolly good.” He points uphill and says “byre.” Then he points to the low thick cloud spitting infinitesimal pinpricks of rain and says something that sounds like “roarie-bummlers” and then something else, maybe “plype,” that sounds benevolent, though she can’t really understand any of it. He stares at her too much. She can feel his gaze on her as she walks uphill, past the farmhouse and toward the cowshed, and she thinks that through the so ft pecking of drizzle on grass she hears him say “hot chocolate.” e Th night before, aer s ft he and Jim came down by bus from Edinburgh and checked into their mildewed eighteenth-century inn with rusty faucets and ivy-clasped walls, Iman walked a

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 18, 2019

There are no references for this article.