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Beyond Personal Identity: Dogen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self (review)

Beyond Personal Identity: Dogen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self (review) 200 BOOK R EV IEWS such passage. But their response is based on the assumption that Nägärjuna’s text obeys the via negativa format advocated in later centuries by Prasangika-Mad- hyamikas. What if we regard Mülamadhyamakakärikä as performance art? Could we read it as the script for a philosophical soliloquy, in the way, as has been suggested, that Philosophical Investigations can be read? In that way, every sentence could be taken as expressing the emerging thoughts of someone who has not yet become a buddha, but is working toward that goal. Thus Mülamadhyamakakärikä could be understood as the product of Nägärjuna’s skillful means, without supposing that it expresses what Nägärjuna knows. At any rate, I can find nothing about the text that forces us to believe it is expressing Nägärjuna’s own views—although the text cer- tainly reveals a perspective that is, at times, averse to the idea that Nägärjuna would have a view to express (just two examples: 13:8 and 27:30). Taken altogether, Garfield’s Empty Words is an adventurous, provocative explo- ration of various themes in Buddhist philosophy, as I hope will be evident from this review. Anyone interested in keeping an eye on the Euro-American philosophical tra- dition while http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Beyond Personal Identity: Dogen, Nishida, and a Phenomenology of No-Self (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 25 – Oct 10, 2005

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

200 BOOK R EV IEWS such passage. But their response is based on the assumption that Nägärjuna’s text obeys the via negativa format advocated in later centuries by Prasangika-Mad- hyamikas. What if we regard Mülamadhyamakakärikä as performance art? Could we read it as the script for a philosophical soliloquy, in the way, as has been suggested, that Philosophical Investigations can be read? In that way, every sentence could be taken as expressing the emerging thoughts of someone who has not yet become a buddha, but is working toward that goal. Thus Mülamadhyamakakärikä could be understood as the product of Nägärjuna’s skillful means, without supposing that it expresses what Nägärjuna knows. At any rate, I can find nothing about the text that forces us to believe it is expressing Nägärjuna’s own views—although the text cer- tainly reveals a perspective that is, at times, averse to the idea that Nägärjuna would have a view to express (just two examples: 13:8 and 27:30). Taken altogether, Garfield’s Empty Words is an adventurous, provocative explo- ration of various themes in Buddhist philosophy, as I hope will be evident from this review. Anyone interested in keeping an eye on the Euro-American philosophical tra- dition while

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 10, 2005

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