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Bernard Shaw and China: Cross-Cultural Encounters (review)

Bernard Shaw and China: Cross-Cultural Encounters (review) traditional performance or the role of the woman warrior in Chinese literature and popular culture. Bradford Clark Bowling Green State University BERNARD SHAW AND CHINA: CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS. By Kay Li. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007. xviii + 285 pp. Cloth $59.95. In 1933, Bernard Shaw went to China during his world tour. It is not difficult to recognize what seems to be a global commonplace--that cultural celebrities travel well, as do their ideas and texts. What is challenging is how to think thorny issues of cross-cultural encounters through this phenomenon productively. Kay Li's book is a study of Shaw's "comic cultural disconnects" with modern China (1). Li sets herself the task to trace Shaw's "passage to China" through its two paradoxes: "No matter how much the people of China had wanted to meet Xiao Bo-na [Bernard Shaw] in person, he had never intended such an encounter. . . . On the other hand, over time the Chinese have managed to reach Xiao Bo-na" (3). The loosely organized eight chapters of the book attempt to cover a vast ground: Shaw's first visit to China, Chineseinspired characters in Shaw's own plays and translation, and stage productions and films of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Bernard Shaw and China: Cross-Cultural Encounters (review)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

traditional performance or the role of the woman warrior in Chinese literature and popular culture. Bradford Clark Bowling Green State University BERNARD SHAW AND CHINA: CROSS-CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS. By Kay Li. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007. xviii + 285 pp. Cloth $59.95. In 1933, Bernard Shaw went to China during his world tour. It is not difficult to recognize what seems to be a global commonplace--that cultural celebrities travel well, as do their ideas and texts. What is challenging is how to think thorny issues of cross-cultural encounters through this phenomenon productively. Kay Li's book is a study of Shaw's "comic cultural disconnects" with modern China (1). Li sets herself the task to trace Shaw's "passage to China" through its two paradoxes: "No matter how much the people of China had wanted to meet Xiao Bo-na [Bernard Shaw] in person, he had never intended such an encounter. . . . On the other hand, over time the Chinese have managed to reach Xiao Bo-na" (3). The loosely organized eight chapters of the book attempt to cover a vast ground: Shaw's first visit to China, Chineseinspired characters in Shaw's own plays and translation, and stage productions and films of

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 1, 2008

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