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Belated Eulogy: A Family Album

Belated Eulogy: A Family Album S H U Z O U E M O T O I was born in Hiroshima in 1947 and lived in Japan until I was five. In 1953, our family left Hiroshima on the ocean liner called President Cleveland to live in Hawai`i, my mother's birthplace. The war had ended too recently for certain wounds and resentments to have healed, and I was told it was best to stay quiet about the fact that my father had been an officer in the Japanese army. I've kept silent ever since, and only my close friends have known. Now, I'm fifty-three, it's a new millennium, and it feels redemptive to finally acknowledge my father and share openly these photographic memories. The story could begin with my maternal grandfather, Kamezo Tsujiuchi. Born in Tanomi, Wakayama Prefecture, he had come to Hawai`i in his teens, sent for by his own father. My grandfather became a fisherman, and eventually owned two sampans, which he docked in Kewalo Basin, in Honolulu Harbor. He apparently made a good living fishing for aku (tuna) because in 1940 he was able to send his family back to Japan. Others were doing the same, hoping to protect their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Belated Eulogy: A Family Album

Manoa , Volume 13 (1) – Jan 4, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

S H U Z O U E M O T O I was born in Hiroshima in 1947 and lived in Japan until I was five. In 1953, our family left Hiroshima on the ocean liner called President Cleveland to live in Hawai`i, my mother's birthplace. The war had ended too recently for certain wounds and resentments to have healed, and I was told it was best to stay quiet about the fact that my father had been an officer in the Japanese army. I've kept silent ever since, and only my close friends have known. Now, I'm fifty-three, it's a new millennium, and it feels redemptive to finally acknowledge my father and share openly these photographic memories. The story could begin with my maternal grandfather, Kamezo Tsujiuchi. Born in Tanomi, Wakayama Prefecture, he had come to Hawai`i in his teens, sent for by his own father. My grandfather became a fisherman, and eventually owned two sampans, which he docked in Kewalo Basin, in Honolulu Harbor. He apparently made a good living fishing for aku (tuna) because in 1940 he was able to send his family back to Japan. Others were doing the same, hoping to protect their

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 4, 2001

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