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Being Māori in the City: Indigenous Everyday Life in Auckland by Natacha Gagné (review)

Being Māori in the City: Indigenous Everyday Life in Auckland by Natacha Gagné (review) the contemporary pacific · 27:1 (2015) sand years" (96). The death of her mother is "woven" into the biogeography of the narrator; her relationship with the physical world around her has shifted to embed her mother in the night sky. The opening page quotes a Tuvaluan invitation to dance--"E lei ma saka taua?"--along with boxer Muhammad Ali's famous quote, "The fight is won or lost . . . long before I dance under these lights." Dark Sparring is both a bout and a dance. I am reminded of Alice Walker's tenacious claim, "Hard times require furious dancing. Each of us is the proof" (Hard Times Require Furious Dancing, 2010, xvi). Dark Sparring is controlled; there is tonal definition between the different faceted surfaces of grief. It is difficult to resist boxing analogies for the collection. Dark Sparring packs a punch. It is a hardworking collection that punches above its weight. narrator channels her grief through the boxing ring. There is something discomfiting and necessary about poetry that steps on the invisible fault lines of what we consider poetic; boxing seems almost anti-poetry, evoking the sweaty and visceral force of fist against flesh, instead of poetry's more subtle but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Being Māori in the City: Indigenous Everyday Life in Auckland by Natacha Gagné (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 27 (1) – Jun 5, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 27:1 (2015) sand years" (96). The death of her mother is "woven" into the biogeography of the narrator; her relationship with the physical world around her has shifted to embed her mother in the night sky. The opening page quotes a Tuvaluan invitation to dance--"E lei ma saka taua?"--along with boxer Muhammad Ali's famous quote, "The fight is won or lost . . . long before I dance under these lights." Dark Sparring is both a bout and a dance. I am reminded of Alice Walker's tenacious claim, "Hard times require furious dancing. Each of us is the proof" (Hard Times Require Furious Dancing, 2010, xvi). Dark Sparring is controlled; there is tonal definition between the different faceted surfaces of grief. It is difficult to resist boxing analogies for the collection. Dark Sparring packs a punch. It is a hardworking collection that punches above its weight. narrator channels her grief through the boxing ring. There is something discomfiting and necessary about poetry that steps on the invisible fault lines of what we consider poetic; boxing seems almost anti-poetry, evoking the sweaty and visceral force of fist against flesh, instead of poetry's more subtle but

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 5, 2015

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