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Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism (review)

Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism (review) BOOK REVIEWS Henrion-Dourcy in her study of female performing artists, also in this volume, gravitate much more strongly around ethnicity than gender. The use of the body in what Barnett sees as ``ritualized'' political acts in the case of both elite women in official state-sanctioned positions and activist nuns brings both categories of women into the dialogue on asceticism and difference. Both lifestyle and intention serve as stringent measures in the public interpretation of the success of these women in performing their ``Tibetanness.'' Material and emotional overindulgence often indicate an inauthentic performance, while emotional reserve and humility may communicate powerful messages about ethnic, religious, and communal identity. Furthermore, the symbolic picture created by these signs gives the performances of these women a significance that transcends the often liminal and highly regulated social stage upon which they are enacted. However, the divide between the symbolic and the social becomes troubled not only in lived political circumstance but also in the view of the scholar himself. In designating the nonviolent political activity of nuns as ``feminizing,'' Barnett walks a fine line, reminding the reader that the project of opening up new conceptual spaces for the narratives of individual females requires http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Being Benevolence: The Social Ethics of Engaged Buddhism (review)

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Aug 30, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Henrion-Dourcy in her study of female performing artists, also in this volume, gravitate much more strongly around ethnicity than gender. The use of the body in what Barnett sees as ``ritualized'' political acts in the case of both elite women in official state-sanctioned positions and activist nuns brings both categories of women into the dialogue on asceticism and difference. Both lifestyle and intention serve as stringent measures in the public interpretation of the success of these women in performing their ``Tibetanness.'' Material and emotional overindulgence often indicate an inauthentic performance, while emotional reserve and humility may communicate powerful messages about ethnic, religious, and communal identity. Furthermore, the symbolic picture created by these signs gives the performances of these women a significance that transcends the often liminal and highly regulated social stage upon which they are enacted. However, the divide between the symbolic and the social becomes troubled not only in lived political circumstance but also in the view of the scholar himself. In designating the nonviolent political activity of nuns as ``feminizing,'' Barnett walks a fine line, reminding the reader that the project of opening up new conceptual spaces for the narratives of individual females requires

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 30, 2007

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