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Being Amerindian Today: Livelihoods, Technology, and Dynamic Indigenous Knowledges

Being Amerindian Today: Livelihoods, Technology, and Dynamic Indigenous Knowledges Being Amerindian Today: Livelihoods, Technology, and Dynamic Indigenous Knowledges Elisa Bignante* University of Torino, Italy It is well known in human geography that Indigenous knowledges are often too simplistically associated with “tradition,” with the risk of crystallizing alleged “traditional identities” without taking into account their dynamic nature and the historical, socioeconomic, and political processes in which these develop (Bebbington 1993; Jackson and Warren 2005). Indigenous Figure 1.—Katoonarib, South Rupununi, Guyana. A woman roasting cassava. The Guiana Shield region of South America is largely inhabited by thriving Indigenous communities, whose knowledge and skills are indispensable for effective conservation of the region and are a great asset to world culture. *Photography by Andrea Borgarello, unless otherwise noted. © 2017 by the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. Bignante: Being Amerindian Today knowledges have been in constant and close contact (and contrast) with Western culture and Western capitalism since at least the fifteenth century. Figure 2.—Wowetta, North Rupununi, Guyana. Along the centuries, and through the action of missionaries, Christian religion has spread among the Indigenous communities of the Amazon forest. Technological change and new products and ideas have long spread within Indigenous communities (Agrawal 1995), as part of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers University of Hawai'I Press

Being Amerindian Today: Livelihoods, Technology, and Dynamic Indigenous Knowledges

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1551-3211
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Abstract

Being Amerindian Today: Livelihoods, Technology, and Dynamic Indigenous Knowledges Elisa Bignante* University of Torino, Italy It is well known in human geography that Indigenous knowledges are often too simplistically associated with “tradition,” with the risk of crystallizing alleged “traditional identities” without taking into account their dynamic nature and the historical, socioeconomic, and political processes in which these develop (Bebbington 1993; Jackson and Warren 2005). Indigenous Figure 1.—Katoonarib, South Rupununi, Guyana. A woman roasting cassava. The Guiana Shield region of South America is largely inhabited by thriving Indigenous communities, whose knowledge and skills are indispensable for effective conservation of the region and are a great asset to world culture. *Photography by Andrea Borgarello, unless otherwise noted. © 2017 by the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers. All rights reserved. Bignante: Being Amerindian Today knowledges have been in constant and close contact (and contrast) with Western culture and Western capitalism since at least the fifteenth century. Figure 2.—Wowetta, North Rupununi, Guyana. Along the centuries, and through the action of missionaries, Christian religion has spread among the Indigenous communities of the Amazon forest. Technological change and new products and ideas have long spread within Indigenous communities (Agrawal 1995), as part of a

Journal

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 9, 2017

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