Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ballad of the Himalayas: Stories of Tibet by Ma Yuan (review)

Ballad of the Himalayas: Stories of Tibet by Ma Yuan (review) Reviews Pursuing this biopolitical paradigm further -- and further refining accounts of its applicability to different media and categories of life -- might yield invaluable answers to other questions. For example, how does the conceptual content of the term "biopolitics" change when the object of analysis shifts from a literary or visual representation of bodies to, say, the actual performance of a human body? If, as Lu proposes, biopolitics encompasses the techniques of governing and tactics of enacting not just bodily life but also "the psyche" and "libidinal economies," what exactly constitutes the bios of desires and affects, and what differentiates the biopolitics of the body from that of the mind? Lu's capacious engagement with diverse cultural forms and practices fruitfully broadens the horizon of biopolitical criticism, permitting us to chart these new lines of inquiry for China and beyond. Belinda Kong Belinda Kong is an associate professor of Asian studies and English at Bowdoin College with research specialization in transnational Asian American literature and Chinese diaspora fiction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Ballad of the Himalayas: Stories of Tibet by Ma Yuan (review)

China Review International , Volume 18 (4) – Jan 30, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/ballad-of-the-himalayas-stories-of-tibet-by-ma-yuan-review-6UxsokJ37U
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reviews Pursuing this biopolitical paradigm further -- and further refining accounts of its applicability to different media and categories of life -- might yield invaluable answers to other questions. For example, how does the conceptual content of the term "biopolitics" change when the object of analysis shifts from a literary or visual representation of bodies to, say, the actual performance of a human body? If, as Lu proposes, biopolitics encompasses the techniques of governing and tactics of enacting not just bodily life but also "the psyche" and "libidinal economies," what exactly constitutes the bios of desires and affects, and what differentiates the biopolitics of the body from that of the mind? Lu's capacious engagement with diverse cultural forms and practices fruitfully broadens the horizon of biopolitical criticism, permitting us to chart these new lines of inquiry for China and beyond. Belinda Kong Belinda Kong is an associate professor of Asian studies and English at Bowdoin College with research specialization in transnational Asian American literature and Chinese diaspora fiction.

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 30, 2011

There are no references for this article.