Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Baby No-Eyes (review)

Baby No-Eyes (review) 554 the contemporary pacific • fall 2000 reading however, the reader, at least this reader, becomes a member of the whanau, extended family; the charac- ters are familiar, their relationships, problems, secrets, idiosyncrasies, part of everyday life. It is like being wel- comed onto a marae; we arrive as manuhiri, visitors, but after the powhiri, official welcome, and hongi, the mingling of breath, strangers become tangatawhenua, people of the land. The prologue introduces the major characters through Tawera, talking from inside the womb. We experience Te Paania his mother, described as “the frog”; we hear of Glen, Tawera’s *** absent and inconsequential father; Baby No-Eyes, by Patricia Grace. meet Dave and Mahaki, the gay Auckland: Penguin Books, isbn couple who protect and nurture the 0-14-027993-8, and Honolulu: family; and welcome Kura the kuia, University of Hawai‘i Press, isbn woman elder, who arrives to assist 0-8248-2161-0, 1998. 294 pages. an impatient Tawera into the world. Paper, us$19.95. There are also hints of a presence, unnamed and unknown, the one char- This novel may bewilder, confuse, and acter not so easily pinned down. Baby perhaps even irritate some readers. No-Eyes is deceased but highly ani- Those familiar with Patricia Grace’s mated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Baby No-Eyes (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 12 (2) – Jul 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/baby-no-eyes-review-UkqtQ0rwci
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

554 the contemporary pacific • fall 2000 reading however, the reader, at least this reader, becomes a member of the whanau, extended family; the charac- ters are familiar, their relationships, problems, secrets, idiosyncrasies, part of everyday life. It is like being wel- comed onto a marae; we arrive as manuhiri, visitors, but after the powhiri, official welcome, and hongi, the mingling of breath, strangers become tangatawhenua, people of the land. The prologue introduces the major characters through Tawera, talking from inside the womb. We experience Te Paania his mother, described as “the frog”; we hear of Glen, Tawera’s *** absent and inconsequential father; Baby No-Eyes, by Patricia Grace. meet Dave and Mahaki, the gay Auckland: Penguin Books, isbn couple who protect and nurture the 0-14-027993-8, and Honolulu: family; and welcome Kura the kuia, University of Hawai‘i Press, isbn woman elder, who arrives to assist 0-8248-2161-0, 1998. 294 pages. an impatient Tawera into the world. Paper, us$19.95. There are also hints of a presence, unnamed and unknown, the one char- This novel may bewilder, confuse, and acter not so easily pinned down. Baby perhaps even irritate some readers. No-Eyes is deceased but highly ani- Those familiar with Patricia Grace’s mated

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.