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Autobiography, Travel and Postnational Identity: Gandhi, Nehru and Iqbal (review)

Autobiography, Travel and Postnational Identity: Gandhi, Nehru and Iqbal (review) Reviews 379 new technologies facilitate distinctively contemporary experiments in self- projection. . . . Yet these selves and worlds are deeply rooted in past antago- nisms and struggles for power and legitimacy” (5). Because she is alive to this condition, Whitlock avoids the peril of technological determinism. She also makes it possible to see how Pax’s blog blends the extraordinary with the ba- nal. Ordinary life during wartime takes syntactical form—Pax “says ‘thingy’ too often”—as well as material form—“Pax inhabits Baghdad,” employing virtual means to capture the feel of the place (28). Whitlock notes that Pax writes in the august tradition of the native informant, but he is no naive prac- titioner of the art. He links his prose to international and local journalistic commentary, internet promotions for Arab-language soap operas, and infor- mation about the Qu’ran, a combination that reveals him as a “master trader in the economy of sharing, the currency of exchange in the online commu- nity” (41). Whitlock’s chapter on Nafisi focuses on a rather different model of textu - al assemblage, literary canonicity. Reading Lolita in Tehran retools the genre of memoir for the didactic project of bringing “Western canonical literature, and modernist writing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Autobiography, Travel and Postnational Identity: Gandhi, Nehru and Iqbal (review)

Biography , Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

Reviews 379 new technologies facilitate distinctively contemporary experiments in self- projection. . . . Yet these selves and worlds are deeply rooted in past antago- nisms and struggles for power and legitimacy” (5). Because she is alive to this condition, Whitlock avoids the peril of technological determinism. She also makes it possible to see how Pax’s blog blends the extraordinary with the ba- nal. Ordinary life during wartime takes syntactical form—Pax “says ‘thingy’ too often”—as well as material form—“Pax inhabits Baghdad,” employing virtual means to capture the feel of the place (28). Whitlock notes that Pax writes in the august tradition of the native informant, but he is no naive prac- titioner of the art. He links his prose to international and local journalistic commentary, internet promotions for Arab-language soap operas, and infor- mation about the Qu’ran, a combination that reveals him as a “master trader in the economy of sharing, the currency of exchange in the online commu- nity” (41). Whitlock’s chapter on Nafisi focuses on a rather different model of textu - al assemblage, literary canonicity. Reading Lolita in Tehran retools the genre of memoir for the didactic project of bringing “Western canonical literature, and modernist writing

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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