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Atua: Sacred Gods from Polynesia (review)

Atua: Sacred Gods from Polynesia (review) book and media reviews and Smoa, tattoo needles, and a small wooden leg from the Marquesas inscribed with tattoos. On the second floor, a display of similar objects emphasizes a different message; here, visitors learn that Polynesian tattoos and geometric motifs most likely developed from the Lapita peoples and their distinctive pottery designs in Near Oceania some 3,500 years ago. The museum's archaeological research on the settlement of Oceania dominates the second floor. A wall map of migration routes, object cases, computer stations, and an interactive display on how scientists gather and analyze data offer a variety of learning experiences. The cases are sparer and more aesthetically striking than those on the main floor. In some instances, the central text panel must be read through objects suspended in the foreground, making viewing and reading a compelling process. The dramatic use of lighting from below also enhances the details of pottery designs, adzes, fishhooks, and shell chisels. As a non-Native museum scholar, I was impressed by the range of exhibits, including a large community mural and a section devoted to interactive games. However, the few Pacific Island museum administrators and graduate students I queried could not hide their disappointment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Atua: Sacred Gods from Polynesia (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 27 (1) – Jun 5, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book and media reviews and Smoa, tattoo needles, and a small wooden leg from the Marquesas inscribed with tattoos. On the second floor, a display of similar objects emphasizes a different message; here, visitors learn that Polynesian tattoos and geometric motifs most likely developed from the Lapita peoples and their distinctive pottery designs in Near Oceania some 3,500 years ago. The museum's archaeological research on the settlement of Oceania dominates the second floor. A wall map of migration routes, object cases, computer stations, and an interactive display on how scientists gather and analyze data offer a variety of learning experiences. The cases are sparer and more aesthetically striking than those on the main floor. In some instances, the central text panel must be read through objects suspended in the foreground, making viewing and reading a compelling process. The dramatic use of lighting from below also enhances the details of pottery designs, adzes, fishhooks, and shell chisels. As a non-Native museum scholar, I was impressed by the range of exhibits, including a large community mural and a section devoted to interactive games. However, the few Pacific Island museum administrators and graduate students I queried could not hide their disappointment

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 5, 2015

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