Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Asymmetry, Essentialism, and Covert Cultural Imperialism: Should Buddhists and Christians Do Theoretical Work Together?

Asymmetry, Essentialism, and Covert Cultural Imperialism: Should Buddhists and Christians Do... Asymmetry, Essentialism, and Covert Cultural Imperialism Should Buddhists and Christians Do Theoretical Work Together? Grace G. Burford Prescott College Meaningful dialogue among Buddhists and Christians on any topic--theological or otherwise--requires the participation of open-minded and mutually respectful Buddhists and Christians. It is just such Christians and Buddhists who founded the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS), and it is this society's ongoing commitment to a balance of Buddhists and Christians, as well as other forms of diversity, in our programs and projects that has kept this dialogue lively. In this supportive context, Christians have done some excellent work in developing their religious thinking by reflecting on Buddhism, as have Buddhists by engaging with Christian theology. Nevertheless, a certain asymmetry has at times emerged in our dialogical endeavors, particularly when it comes to theological issues: it seems there might be more Christians interested in Buddhist thought than Buddhists interested in Christian theology. asymmetry of interest This asymmetry became clear to me when I contributed to two books Rita M. Gross and Terry C. Muck put together in 2000 and 2003. In the introduction to the first of these books, Buddhists Talk about Jesus, Christians Talk about the Buddha, Gross notes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Asymmetry, Essentialism, and Covert Cultural Imperialism: Should Buddhists and Christians Do Theoretical Work Together?

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Nov 4, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/asymmetry-essentialism-and-covert-cultural-imperialism-should-0NVpV9C8Ri
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Asymmetry, Essentialism, and Covert Cultural Imperialism Should Buddhists and Christians Do Theoretical Work Together? Grace G. Burford Prescott College Meaningful dialogue among Buddhists and Christians on any topic--theological or otherwise--requires the participation of open-minded and mutually respectful Buddhists and Christians. It is just such Christians and Buddhists who founded the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS), and it is this society's ongoing commitment to a balance of Buddhists and Christians, as well as other forms of diversity, in our programs and projects that has kept this dialogue lively. In this supportive context, Christians have done some excellent work in developing their religious thinking by reflecting on Buddhism, as have Buddhists by engaging with Christian theology. Nevertheless, a certain asymmetry has at times emerged in our dialogical endeavors, particularly when it comes to theological issues: it seems there might be more Christians interested in Buddhist thought than Buddhists interested in Christian theology. asymmetry of interest This asymmetry became clear to me when I contributed to two books Rita M. Gross and Terry C. Muck put together in 2000 and 2003. In the introduction to the first of these books, Buddhists Talk about Jesus, Christians Talk about the Buddha, Gross notes

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 4, 2011

There are no references for this article.