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Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World (review)

Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World (review) Book Reviews the importance of avoiding the use of categories that unify under the same label groups that came from vastly distant regions in West and West-Central Africa. Finally, this reader also wonders how well did each group really understand each other's deathways? I suspect we might very well be witnessing another example of what Wyatt MacGaffey appropriately called "dialogues of the deaf," the misunderstandings and partial readings that marked the cultural negotiations between all groups thrown into the early modern Atlantic world's maelstrom. Death in the New World is a welcome and important contribution to the growing field of studies about death in the early modern New World that will certainly be an obligatory point of reference for all scholars working in this field. pablo f. gomez Texas Christian University Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World. Edited by john d. garrigus and christopher morris. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2010. 168 pp. $29.95 (cloth). In this small collection of essays edited by John D. Garrigus and Christopher Morris, several historians of North America, South America, and the West Indies explore the significance of racial identity in the early modern Atlantic world. While http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (4) – Nov 25, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews the importance of avoiding the use of categories that unify under the same label groups that came from vastly distant regions in West and West-Central Africa. Finally, this reader also wonders how well did each group really understand each other's deathways? I suspect we might very well be witnessing another example of what Wyatt MacGaffey appropriately called "dialogues of the deaf," the misunderstandings and partial readings that marked the cultural negotiations between all groups thrown into the early modern Atlantic world's maelstrom. Death in the New World is a welcome and important contribution to the growing field of studies about death in the early modern New World that will certainly be an obligatory point of reference for all scholars working in this field. pablo f. gomez Texas Christian University Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World. Edited by john d. garrigus and christopher morris. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2010. 168 pp. $29.95 (cloth). In this small collection of essays edited by John D. Garrigus and Christopher Morris, several historians of North America, South America, and the West Indies explore the significance of racial identity in the early modern Atlantic world. While

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 25, 2011

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