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Asia and the Middle Pleistocene in Global Perspective

Asia and the Middle Pleistocene in Global Perspective LYNNE A. SCHEPARTZ AND SARI MILLER-ANTONIO Differences among the Asian, African, and European prehistoric records are well documented by assemblages that illustrate technological variability and diverse subsistence strategies. Until recently these di¤erences were interpreted without detailed knowledge of Asian paleoenvironments. In addition, early Pleistocene hominid expansions from Africa into regions of Asia, once thought to have taken place no earlier than one million years ago, are now unquestionably much older. Not only did these movements greatly enlarge the human territory, but they also exposed humans to the vast array of resources they still exploit today. Hominid encounters with Asian environments involved the continued exploitation of grasslands and also o¤ered the challenge of adaptation to uplands, colder regions, and sub-tropical zones--a pattern that became widespread during the Middle Pleistocene (787­127 kya, corresponding to Oxygen Isotope Stages 19­6). These topics were the focus of a conference and discussions held in 2001 at the East-West Center in Honolulu (see Miller-Antonio et al. [2001] for more details on the conference). Selected papers from that meeting are collected in this volume, and serve as a forum for exchange between parts of the world that have long been studied in relative isolation. Figure 1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Asia and the Middle Pleistocene in Global Perspective

Asian Perspectives , Volume 43 (2)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

LYNNE A. SCHEPARTZ AND SARI MILLER-ANTONIO Differences among the Asian, African, and European prehistoric records are well documented by assemblages that illustrate technological variability and diverse subsistence strategies. Until recently these di¤erences were interpreted without detailed knowledge of Asian paleoenvironments. In addition, early Pleistocene hominid expansions from Africa into regions of Asia, once thought to have taken place no earlier than one million years ago, are now unquestionably much older. Not only did these movements greatly enlarge the human territory, but they also exposed humans to the vast array of resources they still exploit today. Hominid encounters with Asian environments involved the continued exploitation of grasslands and also o¤ered the challenge of adaptation to uplands, colder regions, and sub-tropical zones--a pattern that became widespread during the Middle Pleistocene (787­127 kya, corresponding to Oxygen Isotope Stages 19­6). These topics were the focus of a conference and discussions held in 2001 at the East-West Center in Honolulu (see Miller-Antonio et al. [2001] for more details on the conference). Selected papers from that meeting are collected in this volume, and serve as a forum for exchange between parts of the world that have long been studied in relative isolation. Figure 1

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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